Scotticism

(redirected from Scotticisms)

Scot·ti·cism

 (skŏt′ĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
An idiom or other expression characteristic of Scottish English.

Scotticism

(ˈskɒtɪˌsɪzəm)
n
(Linguistics) a Scottish idiom, word, etc

Scotticism, Scoticism, Scottishism

a feature characteristic of Scottish English or a word or phrase commonly used in Scotland rather than in England or America, as bonny.
See also: Language
Translations

Scotticism

[ˈskɒtɪsɪzəm] Ngiro m escocés, escocesismo m

Scotticism

References in periodicals archive ?
Scots needed to weed out Scotticisms from their speech if they were to carve out careers at London: 'those whose object is to have some share in the administration of national affairs, are under the necessity of conforming to the taste, the manners, and the language of the public.
12) Alexander was no exception: from then on, he embarked on an unending anglicization of his own writings, which he kept revising in order to expunge as many Scotticisms as possible.
For those less familiar with Scottish culture, the absence of detailed explanatory notes and a glossary of less transparent Scotticisms may be problematic.
Stevenson was writing at a time when the prescriptive tradition in phonology, grammar and vocabulary still considered Scotticisms both barbarous and vulgar, but had no objection to their use in poetry (Dossena, 2005: 116-133).
The sample of the groundskeeper's utterances quoted and examined in section 2 below indeed includes the two lexical Scotticisms wee and haggis (both at turn 2.
16) On debates over these terms, see Marina Dossena, Scotticisms (Edinburgh, 2005), especially vii-ix and 8-17.
The indexing of coterie speech (without definition) and of Scotticisms (with definition) in the general index help facilitate understanding, but make for more shuffling of pages.
David Hume, of all people, meekly submitted his prose to David Mallet for the eradication of Scotticisms.
In the haste of composition awkward or redundant phrases had been introduced; Smollett, particularly as a Scot highly sensitive to Scotticisms or any stylistic infelicities which might bring ridicule upon him, corrected as many errors as he could find.
David Hume, although the staunchest of Scots, would nevertheless send his manuscripts to English friends for them to weed out his Scotticisms, which he did not consider appropriate to serious discourse.
Other Scots names are indistinguishable from old-stock American Anglo-Saxon ones, especially after Scotticisms in spelling have disappeared and Wylie has become Wiley.
Robertson's works, in Waverley, in Marmion, Scotticisms at which a London apprentice would laugh?