Scottish


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Related to Scottish: Scottish terrier

Scot·tish

 (skŏt′ĭsh)
adj.
Of or relating to Scotland or its people, language, or culture.
n.
1. Scots English.
2. (used with a pl. verb) The people of Scotland.

[Middle English scottisc; see Scots.]
Usage Note: Scottish is the full, original form of the adjective. Scots is an old Scottish variant. Scotch is an English contraction of Scottish that came into use in Scotland as well for a time (as in Burns's "O thou, my Muse! guid auld Scotch drink!") but subsequently came to be viewed there as insulting. For this reason, forms involving Scotch are best avoided in reference to people; designations formed with Scots are most common (Scot, Scotsman, or Scotswoman), but those involving the full form Scottish are sometimes found in more formal contexts. Scotch-Irish is a commonly used term for the descendants of Scots who migrated to North America, but lately Scots-Irish has begun to gain currency among those who know that Scotch is considered offensive in Scotland. There is, however, no sure rule, especially when referring to things rather than people, since the history of variation in the use of these words has left many expressions in which the choice is fixed, such as Scotch broth, Scotch whisky, Scottish rite, and Scots Guards.

Scottish

(ˈskɒtɪʃ)
adj
1. (Peoples) of, relating to, or characteristic of Scotland, its people, their Gaelic language, or their English dialect
2. (Languages) of, relating to, or characteristic of Scotland, its people, their Gaelic language, or their English dialect
3. (Placename) of, relating to, or characteristic of Scotland, its people, their Gaelic language, or their English dialect
n
(Peoples) the Scottish (functioning as plural) the Scots collectively

Scot•tish

(ˈskɒt ɪʃ)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to Scotland or its inhabitants.
n.
2. (used with a pl. v.) the inhabitants of Scotland; the Scots.
3. Scots.
[1200–50; Middle English < Late Latin Scott(us) Scot + -ish1]
usage: See Scotch.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Scottish - the dialect of English used in ScotlandScottish - the dialect of English used in Scotland
English, English language - an Indo-European language belonging to the West Germanic branch; the official language of Britain and the United States and most of the commonwealth countries
Lallans, Scottish Lallans - a dialect of English spoken in the Lowlands of Scotland
Scotland - one of the four countries that make up the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland; located on the northern part of the island of Great Britain; famous for bagpipes and plaids and kilts
Adj.1.Scottish - of or relating to or characteristic of Scotland or its people or culture or its English dialect or Gaelic language; "Scots Gaelic"; "the Scots community in New York"; "`Scottish' tends to be the more formal term as in `The Scottish Symphony' or `Scottish authors' or `Scottish mountains'"; "`Scotch' is in disfavor with Scottish people and is used primarily outside Scotland except in such frozen phrases as `Scotch broth' or `Scotch whiskey' or `Scotch plaid'"
Translations
skotskýSkotiSkotové
skotsk
skotlantilainen
škotski
スコットランドの
스코틀랜드의
Škótiškótsky
skotsk
เกี่ยวกับสกอตแลนด์
thuộc Scotland

Scottish

[ˈskɒtɪʃ] ADJescocés
a Scottish accentun acento escocés
Scottish OfficeMinisterio m de Asuntos Escoceses
the Scottish Parliamentel Parlamento Escocés

Scottish

[ˈskɒtɪʃ] adjécossais(e)
a Scottish accent → un accent écossais
the Scottish National Party → le parti national écossaisScottish Office n
the Scottish Office → le ministère des Affaires écossaisesScottish Parliament n
the Scottish Parliament → le Parlement écossaisScottish Secretary nministre mf des Affaires écossaises

Scottish

adjschottisch
n
(= dialect)Schottisch nt
the Scottish pldie Schotten pl

Scottish

:
Scottish Nationalism
Scottish National Party
n schottische Partei, die sich für die Unabhängigkeit des Landes einsetzt
Scottish Office
n the Scottishdas Ministerium für schottische Angelegenheiten
Scottish Parliament
n the Scottishdas schottische Parlament
Scottish Secretary
n (Brit Pol) → Minister(in) m(f)für schottische Angelegenheiten

Scottish

[ˈskɒtɪʃ] adjscozzese

Scottish

اِسْكُتْلانْدِيّ skotský skotsk schottisch σκωτικός escocés skotlantilainen écossais škotski scozzese スコットランドの 스코틀랜드의 Schots skotsk szkocki escocês шотландский skotsk เกี่ยวกับสกอตแลนด์ İskoç thuộc Scotland 苏格兰的
References in classic literature ?
Scottish manners, Scottish dialect, and Scottish characters of note, being those with which the author was most intimately, and familiarly acquainted, were the groundwork upon which he had hitherto relied for giving effect to his narrative.
Whether this reasoning be correct or otherwise, the present author felt, that, in confining himself to subjects purely Scottish, he was not only likely to weary out the indulgence of his readers, but also greatly to limit his own power of affording them pleasure.
At one of the extremities of the camp, near an immense tent, in which the Scottish officers were holding a kind of council, presided over by Lord Leven, their commander, a man attired as a cavalier lay sleeping on the turf, his right hand extended over his sword.
I said, sire, that four hundred thousand pounds are owing to the Scottish army.
Most of them were Scots, and best known is the Scottish king, James I.
Largely to the fifteenth century, however, belong those of the English and Scottish 'popular' ballads which the accidents of time have not succeeded in destroying.
The lady announced--in a low sweet voice touched with a quiet sadness--that her business related to a question of marriage (as marriage is understood by Scottish law), and that her own peace of mind, and the happiness of a person very dear to her, were concerned alike in the opinion which Mr.
She then proceeded to state the facts, without mentioning names: relating in every particular precisely the same succession of events which Geoffrey Delamayn had already related to Sir Patrick Lundie--with this one difference, that she acknowledged herself to be the woman who was personally concerned in knowing whether, by Scottish law, she was now held to be a married woman or not.
I made the sign of the Knights of the East and of Jerusalem, and he responded in the same manner, asking me with a mild smile what I had learned and gained in the Prussian and Scottish lodges.
There was a vast deal of solemn deliberation, and hard Scottish reasoning, with an occasional swell of pompous declamation.
that they have taught thee but badly at Beaulieu, for surely a bishop knows more of what is right and what is ill than an abbot can do, and I myself with these very eyes saw the Bishop of Lincoln hew into a Scottish hobeler with a battle-axe, which was a passing strange way of showing him that he loved him.
So it comes about that in old Scottish and in old Irish manuscripts we find the same stories.

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