Scrooge


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Scrooge

also scrooge  (skro͞oj)
n.
A mean-spirited miserly person; a skinflint.

[After Ebenezer Scrooge, miserly protagonist of A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens.]

Scrooge

(skruːdʒ)
n
a mean or miserly person
[C19: after a character in Dickens' story A Christmas Carol (1843)]

Scrooge

(skrudʒ)

n.
1. Ebenezer, a miserly curmudgeon in Dickens' A Christmas Carol.
2. (often l.c.) any miserly person.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Scrooge - a selfish person who is unwilling to give or spendscrooge - a selfish person who is unwilling to give or spend
hoarder - a person who accumulates things and hides them away for future use
pinchgut - a niggardly person who starves himself (and others)

Scrooge

noun miser, penny-pincher (informal), skinflint, cheapskate (informal), tight-arse (taboo slang), tightwad (U.S. & Canad. slang), tight-ass (U.S. taboo slang), niggard, money-grubber (informal), meanie or meany (informal, chiefly Brit.) What a bunch of Scrooges.

Scrooge

also scrooge
noun
A stingy person:
Informal: penny pincher.
Translations
kitupiikki

Scrooge

[skruːdʒ] Nel avariento típico (personaje del "Christmas Carol" de Dickens)

Scrooge

[ˈskruːdʒ] nrat m

Scrooge

nGeizhals m
References in classic literature ?
Scrooge and he were partners for I don't know how many years.
There it stood, years afterwards, above the warehouse door: Scrooge and Marley.
They often `came down' handsomely, and Scrooge never did.
No beggars implored him to bestow a trifle, no children asked him what it was o'clock, no man or woman ever once in all his life inquired the way to such and such a place, of Scrooge.
Once upon a time -- of all the good days in the year, on Christmas Eve -- old Scrooge sat busy in his counting-house.
Scrooge had a very small fire, but the clerk's fire was so very much smaller that it looked like one coal.
If I could work my will,' said Scrooge indignantly, `every idiot who goes about with "Merry Christmas" on his lips, should be boiled with his own pudding, and buried with a stake of holly through his heart.
Let me hear another sound from you,' said Scrooge, `and you'll keep your Christmas by losing your situation
growled Scrooge, as if that were the only one thing in the world more ridiculous than a merry Christmas.
Marley has been dead these seven years,' Scrooge replied.
At the ominous word `liberality,' Scrooge frowned, and shook his head, and handed the credentials back.
Scrooge,' said the gentleman, taking up a pen, `it is more than usually desirable that we should make some slight provision for the Poor and Destitute, who suffer greatly at the present time.