scrub jay

(redirected from Scrub-jay)

scrub jay

or scrub-jay (skrŭb′jā)
n.
Any of several chiefly blue-and-gray jays of the genus Aphelocoma, having no crest and found in dense scrub in North and Central America, especially A. coerulescens of Florida and A. californica of Mexico and the western United States.
References in periodicals archive ?
This charming small town is located on the Intracoastal Waterway and features important historic sites and wildlife refuges, including Historic Spanish Point and Oscar Scherer State Park, a protected habitat for the threatened Florida scrub-jay.
Cathy Brown selected The Florida Scrub-Jay Consortium and Jim Thomas chose Oakland Nature Preserve.
The western scrub-jay (Aphelocoma californica; hereafter scrub-jay) is a common nest predator of songbirds (Small, 2005; Francis et al.
People have this ability, called theory of mind, but proposing, as Clayton does, that the Western scrub-jay can infer what another bird is thinking is a striking conclusion.
The ones that shifted their range downslope include both low-elevation species like the Ash-throated Flycatcher and Western Scrub-Jay, and high-elevation species like the Cassin's Finch and Red-breasted Nuthatch.
The threatened Florida scrub-jay, which lives only in Florida's scrub habitats, is among the unique animal species that you can witness in this type of land.
However, because Cape Canaveral AFS is a critical conservation area for the threatened Florida scrub-jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens), current launch programs are confined to their existing footprints to prevent loss of scrub habitat.
Evolutionary biologist Clinton Francis said birds unaffected by noise succeed because common nest predator the western scrub-jay tends to steer clear of the cacophony.
Some of the high-profile federally and state listed endangered and threatened species addressed in the various journal papers, as well as unpublished theses, include the roseate tern (Sterna dougallii), snail kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis), Florida scrub-jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens), and the wood stork (Mycteria americana) as well as other listed wading birds; the Florida gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus) with its suite of fire-adapted associate species; and sea turtles--especially conservation efforts to limit the effects of raccoon depredations of their nests.
Since 1990, Florida has lost half of the scrub-jay population due to displacement from real estate development and orange groves.
1935-1955 h on 11 May 2010, we observed eight adult California towhees collectively attacking a western scrub-jay on Hilgard Avenue in Berkeley, California (37[degrees]52'44"N, 122[degrees]15032"W; located using Google Earth; http://earth.