scutch


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scutch

 (skŭch)
tr.v. scutched, scutch·ing, scutch·es
To separate the valuable fibers of (flax, for example) from the woody parts by beating, combing, or scraping.
n.
An implement or machine used for scutching.

[Obsolete French escoucher, from Anglo-Norman escucher, from Vulgar Latin *excuticāre, frequentative of Latin excutere, to shake out : ex-, ex- + quatere, to shake; see kwēt- in Indo-European roots.]

scutch′er n.

scutch

(skʌtʃ)
vb
(Textiles) (tr) to separate the fibres from the woody part of (flax) by pounding
n
(Textiles) Also called: scutcher the tool used for this
[C18: from obsolete French escoucher, from Vulgar Latin excuticāre (unattested) to beat out, from Latin ex-1 + quatere to shake]

scutch

(skʌtʃ)
vb (tr)
dialect Northern English to strike with an open hand

scutch

(skʌtʃ)

v.t.
1. to dress (flax) by beating.
n.
2. Also, scutch′er. a device for scutching flax fiber.
[1680–90; < Middle French *escoucher (French écoucher) < Vulgar Latin *excuticāre, for Latin excutere (ex- ex-1 + -cutere, comb. form of quatere to shatter]

scutch


Past participle: scutched
Gerund: scutching

Imperative
scutch
scutch
Present
I scutch
you scutch
he/she/it scutches
we scutch
you scutch
they scutch
Preterite
I scutched
you scutched
he/she/it scutched
we scutched
you scutched
they scutched
Present Continuous
I am scutching
you are scutching
he/she/it is scutching
we are scutching
you are scutching
they are scutching
Present Perfect
I have scutched
you have scutched
he/she/it has scutched
we have scutched
you have scutched
they have scutched
Past Continuous
I was scutching
you were scutching
he/she/it was scutching
we were scutching
you were scutching
they were scutching
Past Perfect
I had scutched
you had scutched
he/she/it had scutched
we had scutched
you had scutched
they had scutched
Future
I will scutch
you will scutch
he/she/it will scutch
we will scutch
you will scutch
they will scutch
Future Perfect
I will have scutched
you will have scutched
he/she/it will have scutched
we will have scutched
you will have scutched
they will have scutched
Future Continuous
I will be scutching
you will be scutching
he/she/it will be scutching
we will be scutching
you will be scutching
they will be scutching
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been scutching
you have been scutching
he/she/it has been scutching
we have been scutching
you have been scutching
they have been scutching
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been scutching
you will have been scutching
he/she/it will have been scutching
we will have been scutching
you will have been scutching
they will have been scutching
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been scutching
you had been scutching
he/she/it had been scutching
we had been scutching
you had been scutching
they had been scutching
Conditional
I would scutch
you would scutch
he/she/it would scutch
we would scutch
you would scutch
they would scutch
Past Conditional
I would have scutched
you would have scutched
he/she/it would have scutched
we would have scutched
you would have scutched
they would have scutched
References in periodicals archive ?
I'd also avoid putting in perennial weeds with fleshy roots such as bindweed and scutch grass as only a bit of the root has to survive for the plant to keep growing.
I sat peering out at Dublin's new urban quarter--fields of scutch grass and clumps of gorse.
They helped soak the flax in water and then scutch it (work it) to separate the fibers.
The wild anemones in the woods in April, the last load at night of hay being drawn down a lane as the twilight comes on, when you can scarcely distinguish the figures of the horses as they take it home to the farm, and above all, most subtle, most penetrating and most moving, the smell of wood smoke coming up in an autumn evening, or the smell of the scutch fires: that wood smoke that our ancestors, tens of thousands of years ago, must have caught on the air when they were coming home with the result of the day's forage, when they were still nomads, and when they were still roaming the forests and the plains of the continent of Europe.