sediment

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sed·i·ment

 (sĕd′ə-mənt)
n.
1. Material that settles to the bottom of a liquid; lees.
2. Solid fragments of inorganic or organic material that come from the weathering of rock and are carried and deposited by wind, water, or ice.

[Latin sedimentum, act of settling, from sedēre, to sit, settle; see sed- in Indo-European roots.]

sediment

(ˈsɛdɪmənt)
n
1. matter that settles to the bottom of a liquid
2. (Geological Science) material that has been deposited from water, ice, or wind
[C16: from Latin sedimentum a settling, from sedēre to sit]
sedimentous adj

sed•i•ment

(ˈsɛd ə mənt)

n.
1. the matter that settles to the bottom of a liquid; lees; dregs.
2. Geol. mineral or organic matter deposited by water, air, or ice.
[1540–50; < Latin sedimentum=sedi- (comb. form of sedēre to sit, settle) + -mentum -ment]
sed`i•men′tous, adj.

sed·i·ment

(sĕd′ə-mənt)
1. Geology Silt, sand, rocks, fossils, and other matter carried and deposited by water, wind, or ice.
2. Chemistry Particles of solid matter that settle out of a suspension to the bottom of the liquid.

sediment

  • decant - Means to pour wine, taking pains not to disturb any sediment at the bottom; decant comes from Latin de- and canthus, "angular lip of a jug."
  • allogenic, allochthonous - Geological material that has been transported and then accumulates elsewhere is allochthonous, and sediment carried by a river is allogenic.
  • lithification - The process of compaction of sediment into stone.
  • swarve - To choke with sediment.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sediment - matter that has been deposited by some natural processsediment - matter that has been deposited by some natural process
matter - that which has mass and occupies space; "physicists study both the nature of matter and the forces which govern it"
alluvial deposit, alluvial sediment, alluvium, alluvion - clay or silt or gravel carried by rushing streams and deposited where the stream slows down
dregs, settlings - sediment that has settled at the bottom of a liquid
lees - the sediment from fermentation of an alcoholic beverage
lick, salt lick - a salt deposit that animals regularly lick
evaporite - the sediment that is left after the evaporation of seawater
Verb1.sediment - deposit as a sediment
posit, situate, deposit, fix - put (something somewhere) firmly; "She posited her hand on his shoulder"; "deposit the suitcase on the bench"; "fix your eyes on this spot"
sediment - settle as sediment
2.sediment - settle as sediment
settle, settle down - settle into a position, usually on a surface or ground; "dust settled on the roofs"
sediment - deposit as a sediment

sediment

sediment

noun
Matter that settles on a bottom or collects on a surface by a natural process:
deposit, dreg (often used in plural), lees, precipitate, precipitation.
Translations
ثُفْل
usazenina
aflejringbundfald
botnfall
nogulsnes

sediment

[ˈsedɪmənt] N (in liquids, boiler) → sedimento m, poso m (Geol) → sedimento m

sediment

[ˈsɛdɪmənt] nsédiment m, dépôt m

sediment

n(Boden)satz m; (in river) → Ablagerung f; (in chemical solution) → Niederschlag m, → Sediment nt

sediment

[ˈsɛdɪmənt] n (in liquids, boiler) → deposito, fondo (Geol) → sedimento

sediment

(ˈsedimənt) noun
the material that settles at the bottom of a liquid. Her feet sank into the sediment on the river bed.

sed·i·ment

n. sedimento, materia que se deposita en el fondo de un líquido.

sediment

n sedimento
References in periodicals archive ?
They based their conclusions on lead levels in the glacier, which would draw materials from the atmosphere and lock them inside the ice, much as the Dead Sea sediment trapped minerals from the water.
In a comprehensive study of aeolian dust in Tasman sea sediment cores, Hesse (1994) showed that dust fluxes from Australia were low prior to 350 ka, followed by an increase in oxygen isotope stage 10 and succeeding peak glacial periods.
Pu ratios of Sellafield effluents, while not reported, have been reconstructed on the basis of measurements made on an Irish Sea sediment core (Kershaw et al.
When Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) marine paleoecologist Marco Coolen was mining through vast amounts of genetic data from the Black Sea sediment record, he was amazed about the variety of past plankton species that left behind their genetic makeup (i.
Layers of ice and sea sediment, for example, indicate precipitation and atmospheric composition.
Using the fossilized remains of these organisms in deep sea sediment cores, marine geologists can reconstruct past changes in sea surface temperature and produce records that document past variations in sea surface conditions caused by changes in the earth-sun orbital geometry and by abrupt changes in ocean circulation.
Farley remains skeptical, however, because sea sediment records going back to the days of the dinosaurs show no dramatic dust surges.
The hemipelagic muds that may extend many hundreds to a thousand kilometers offshore are one of the last major unknowns of the several kinds of deep sea sediment.