secede

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se·cede

 (sĭ-sēd′)
intr.v. se·ced·ed, se·ced·ing, se·cedes
To withdraw formally from membership in a state, union, or other political entity.

[Latin sēcēdere, to withdraw : sē-, apart; see s(w)e- in Indo-European roots + cēdere, to go; see ked- in Indo-European roots.]

secede

(sɪˈsiːd)
vb
(often foll by: from) (of a person, section, etc) to make a formal withdrawal of membership, as from a political alliance, church, organization, etc
[C18: from Latin sēcēdere to withdraw, from sē- apart + cēdere to go]
seˈceder n

se•cede

(sɪˈsid)

v.i. -ced•ed, -ced•ing.
to withdraw formally from an alliance, federation, or association.
[1695–1705; < Latin sēcēdere to withdraw. See se-, cede]
se•ced′er, n.

secede


Past participle: seceded
Gerund: seceding

Imperative
secede
secede
Present
I secede
you secede
he/she/it secedes
we secede
you secede
they secede
Preterite
I seceded
you seceded
he/she/it seceded
we seceded
you seceded
they seceded
Present Continuous
I am seceding
you are seceding
he/she/it is seceding
we are seceding
you are seceding
they are seceding
Present Perfect
I have seceded
you have seceded
he/she/it has seceded
we have seceded
you have seceded
they have seceded
Past Continuous
I was seceding
you were seceding
he/she/it was seceding
we were seceding
you were seceding
they were seceding
Past Perfect
I had seceded
you had seceded
he/she/it had seceded
we had seceded
you had seceded
they had seceded
Future
I will secede
you will secede
he/she/it will secede
we will secede
you will secede
they will secede
Future Perfect
I will have seceded
you will have seceded
he/she/it will have seceded
we will have seceded
you will have seceded
they will have seceded
Future Continuous
I will be seceding
you will be seceding
he/she/it will be seceding
we will be seceding
you will be seceding
they will be seceding
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been seceding
you have been seceding
he/she/it has been seceding
we have been seceding
you have been seceding
they have been seceding
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been seceding
you will have been seceding
he/she/it will have been seceding
we will have been seceding
you will have been seceding
they will have been seceding
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been seceding
you had been seceding
he/she/it had been seceding
we had been seceding
you had been seceding
they had been seceding
Conditional
I would secede
you would secede
he/she/it would secede
we would secede
you would secede
they would secede
Past Conditional
I would have seceded
you would have seceded
he/she/it would have seceded
we would have seceded
you would have seceded
they would have seceded
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.secede - withdraw from an organization or communion; "After the break up of the Soviet Union, many republics broke away"
break up, part, split, split up, separate, break - discontinue an association or relation; go different ways; "The business partners broke over a tax question"; "The couple separated after 25 years of marriage"; "My friend and I split up"

secede

verb withdraw, leave, resign, separate, retire, quit, pull out, break with, split from, disaffiliate, apostatize On 20 August 1960 Senegal seceded.

secede

verb
To break away or withdraw from membership in an association or a federation:
splinter (off).
Informal: split.
Translations

secede

[sɪˈsiːd] VIsepararse, escindirse (from de)

secede

[sɪˈsiːd] vifaire sécession
to secede from → faire sécession de

secede

visich abspalten

secede

[sɪˈsiːd] vi (frm) to secede (from)staccarsi (da)
References in periodicals archive ?
They are an extension of Al Khawarij [the Seceders in the late 7th century who developed and adopted extreme doctrines, declaring other Muslims non-believers who could be killed]," he said in his statement last week
Though Presbyterians arrived in Ireland by way of Scotland in large numbers in the early 1600s, they rather quickly divided (or continued their divisions) into several splinter groups, including the conservative Old Light, Seceders (Burgher and Antiburgher), (Marrow men) and Covenanters, moderate New Light, Arians that formed the Remonstrant synod, liberals, non-subscribers and Unitarians.
problems than abolitionists or seceders (2001, 13).
We may, nevertheless, be permitted to note that in the memorable engagement between the two bodies which have organised the Salons of 1890, victory has fallen to the lot of the seceders.
After 1870, when Pius IX secured the doctrine of infallibility from the First Vatican Council, there were more seceders who tried to create an Italian parallel to the Germanic 'Old Catholics', though their two significant leaders later parted, one returning to Rome and the other, the ecumenical pioneer Ugo Janni, becoming Waldensian.
Already in the first major confrontation over ratifying the Constitution, which took place in Pennsylvania several weeks after the close of the Constitutional Convention, the Seceders from the state Assembly called upon their electorate to consider whether the rights of citizens could be regarded as safe under a constitution which did not contain a bill of rights.