Seleucid


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Se·leu·cid

 (sĭ-lo͞o′sĭd)
adj.
Of or relating to a Hellenistic dynasty founded by Seleucus I after the death of Alexander the Great. It ruled much of Asia Minor from 312 to 64 bc.
n.
A member or subject of this dynasty.

Seleucid

(sɪˈluːsɪd)
n, pl -cids or -cidae (-sɪˌdiː)
(Biography) a member of a royal dynasty (312–64 bc) that at the zenith of its power ruled over an area extending from Thrace to India
adj
(Biography) of, relating to, or supporting the Seleucids or their dynasty
Seleucidan adj

Se•leu•cid

(sɪˈlu sɪd)

n., pl. -cids, -ci•dae (-sɪˌdi)

adj. n.
1. a member of a Macedonian dynasty, 312–64 B.C., ruling an empire that included much of Asia Minor, Syria, Persia, Bactria, and Babylonia.
adj.
2. Also, Se•leu′ci•dan. of or pertaining to the Seleucids or their dynasty.
[1850–55; < New Latin Seleucidēs < Greek Seleukídēs offspring of Seleucus I]
References in periodicals archive ?
This week Jews all over the world celebrate the holiday of Hanukkah, marking the success of the Maccabean revolt, in which a group of Judean rebels defeated the Seleucid Empire and its king.
The Maccabees, at the time that is celebrated today as Hanukkah, rose up to combat the oppression and denial of religious freedom imposed by the Seleucid Dynasty's occupation of Israel.
Researchers have long debated over the location of the Acra, built more than 2,000 years ago by Antiochus Epiphanes, king of the Hellenised Seleucid empire.
The Seleucid Empire was a successor state based on the conquests of which military leader?
Wright's research on the relatively significant number of Jewish conscripts in the Ptolemaic and Seleucid armies suggests that this was a consequence of their service in imperial armies during the Persian period.
Hatra dates back 2,000 years to the Seleucid Empire which controlled a large part of the ancient world conquered by Alexander the Great.
The 9th century is considered Susa's "political and cultural zenith", though the city was important in Achaemenid, Seleucid, Parthian and Sasanian times (6th century BCE-early 7th century CE).
A small band of Jewish warriors called the Hasmoneans liberated Israel from the clutches of the oppressive Seleucid empire, and in the aftermath of battle they searched for oil with which to light the Temple's sevenstemmed candelabra, the menorah.
A small band of Jewish warriors called the Hasmoneans liberated Israel from the clutches of the oppressive Seleucid empire and in the aftermath of battle they searched for oil with which to light the temple's seven-stemmed candelabra, the menorah.
Hanukkah, or the Festival of Lights, celebrates the rededication of the Temple in Jerusalem following the victory of Judas Maccadeus over the Seleucid Empire, during which a small jar of oil, expected to last but a day, burned for eight days.
The land of the elephant kings: space, territory, and ideology in the Seleucid Empire, xv+423 pages, 15 b&w illustrations.