Self-abasing


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Self`-a`bas´ing


a.1.Lowering or humbling one's self.
References in periodicals archive ?
Citizens can still get arrested for criticizing royalty and are obliged to employ self-abasing obsequiousness in any reference to the king.
He is more interested in the latter because he reformed the already self-abasing Benedictine order in the eleventh century, making voluntary seif-flagellation "a central ascetic practice of the church" and thus accomplishing the thousand year struggle "to secure the triumph of pain seeking" (107).
Why did Upham, a moderate Congregationalist with a respect for science, present Madame Guyon's self-abasing piety to his contemporaries as worthy of imitation rather than threatening?
Then there are those who are appalled he is coming back so soon after the grovelling, self-abasing apology for his conduct that he made last month.
Readers familiar with the passionate longing for punishment, ravishment, and consummation expressed in religious verse of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Puritan and Anglican poets and clerics might also question Cima's suggestion that women's passionate and self-abasing conversion testimonies were proof of domestic abuse victims' "desire to perform their sense of violation in an imperfect world" (63).
First, because modernity does not recognize limits save those created by willful individuals, its freedom is excessive and self-abasing.
Austen brings them both to a point where they can speak of themselves in the same self-abasing terms.
It is the Edwards who hallowed as a model of evangelical dedication the self-abasing missionary David Brainerd--a melancholy young man kicked out of Yale College because of his "wildfire party zeal" for New Light preaching (rather than for the partying passions that now earn the censure of college deans and Tom Wolfe).
However, self-abasing in his private medical practice, he was known to serve the poor gratis.
mind, as in this self-abasing note in a pamphlet on Conservative Reform
Babylonian kings look, at best, self-abasing and, at worst, ridiculous, especially when describing their own actions and reactions in previous diplomatic incidents.
Leaf is about the last athlete you'd expect to be self-abasing.