Seljuks


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Seljuks

Turkoman tribes invading western Asia and dominating Palestine and Persia from the 10th to 13th centuries.
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The Uighurs excelled in murals and frescoes; the Seljuks fused the literary and the artistic, creating a humanist, idealised vision of the human form explored in both painting and poetry; Ottoman artists perfected the celebrated Iznik ware, and created calligraphy that was no less beautiful for its employment in symbols of secular and religious authority.
In 1176 the Seljuks of Asia Minor had heavily defeated a large Byzantine army at the Battle of Myriocephalum.
In 1905, a member of the German consulate staff visiting the Alaeddin Mosque of Konya, where the Seljuks had their capital, discovered several Seljuk rugs knotted between 1220 and 1250.
Throughout Turkish political history, during the reigns of both the Seljuks and the Ottomans, Islam remained under the control of the state, but it was also seen as a source of legitimate guidance.
However, just as Rome was imperilled by Goths and Vandals, so Constantinople and its eastern dominion in Asia Minor had also to withstand incursions: of the Arabs as invaders and/or as pirates in the seventh and eighth centuries; of the Seljuks in the eleventh century, who at Manzikert in 1017 destroyed the Byzantine armies and took over the rich granary of Anatolia; and from the next century almost to its fall in 1453, the Byzantine world was over-run by the Crusaders, nominally there as Christian allies, but in fact seeking booty and territory.
You get a feel for how exotic this land and each civilization which has left its traces in and around Anatolia ranging from Ancient Age to Byzantium, the Seljuks, the Ottoman to the Republic.
Masoud I of Ghazni after the dynasty's inability to provide sometime later, the scope of his rule was limited to parts of India and Afghanistan and Khorasan Seljuks conquered income.
Initial official relations between the Seljuks and Crimea, however, date back to the year 1221, when Amir Husameddin Coban of the Anatolian Seljuk Empire launched a military campaign to capture the peninsula.
We offer you a unique opportunity to discover the Silk Road with the Seljuks.
Wolper seeks to demonstrate that sufi architecture, particularly dervish lodges, transformed the urban landscape of Anatolia in the aftermath of the 1240 Baba Rasul revolt, in which a combination of Turcomans, sufis, and Christians rebelled against the Rum Seljuk sultan Kaykhusrau II, and the 1243 Mongol defeat of the Seljuks at Kose Dag.
It provides a guide to the history of the Near East from around AD 600 (the period of Muhammad and hence the birth of Islamic society), via the great conquests and the golden age of the Umayyad and Abbasid caliphates, to AD 1050, with fragmentation and the beginning of the era of the Great Seljuks.