semicolon

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semicolon

Semicolons ( ; ) are used for two main purposes: to separate lengthy or complex items within a list and to connect independent clauses. They are often described as being more powerful than commas, while not quite as a strong as periods (full stops).
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sem·i·co·lon

 (sĕm′ĭ-kō′lən)
n.
A mark of punctuation ( ; ) used to connect independent clauses and indicating a closer relationship between the clauses than a period does.

semicolon

(ˌsɛmɪˈkəʊlən)
n
(Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) the punctuation mark (;) used to indicate a pause intermediate in value or length between that of a comma and that of a full stop

sem•i•co•lon

(ˈsɛm ɪˌkoʊ lən)

n.
the punctuation mark (;) used to indicate a major division in a sentence where a more distinct separation is felt between clauses or items on a list than is indicated by a comma, as between the two clauses of a compound sentence.
[1635–45]

semicolon

A punctuation mark (;) used to mark a pause longer than a comma but shorter than a period.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.semicolon - a punctuation mark (`;') used to connect independent clauses; indicates a closer relation than does a period
punctuation mark, punctuation - the marks used to clarify meaning by indicating separation of words into sentences and clauses and phrases
Translations
فَصْلَةٌ مَنْقُوطَةفَصْلَه او شَوْلَةٌ مَنْقوطَه
středník
semikolon
puolipiste
נקודה ופסיק
točka-zarez
pontosvessző
semíkomma
セミコロン
세미콜론
kabliataškis
semikols
punct şi virgulă
podpičje
semikolon
เครื่องหมายอัฒภาค
dấu chấm phẩy

semicolon

semi-colon [ˌsɛmiˈkəʊlən] npoint-virgule m

semicolon

[ˌsɛmɪˈkəʊlən] npunto e virgola

semicolon

(semiˈkəulən) , ((American) ˈsemikoulən) noun
the punctuation mark (;) used especially to separate parts of a sentence which have more independence than clauses separated by a comma. He wondered what to do. He couldn't go back; he couldn't borrow money.

semicolon

فَصْلَةٌ مَنْقُوطَة středník semikolon Semikolon άνω τελεία punto y coma puolipiste point virgule točka-zarez punto e virgola セミコロン 세미콜론 puntkomma semikolon średnik ponto e vírgula, ponto-e-vírgula точка с запятой semikolon เครื่องหมายอัฒภาค ; noktalı virgül dấu chấm phẩy 分号
References in classic literature ?
Somebody put a drop under a magnifying-glass and it was all semicolons and parentheses," said Mrs.
It was the big thing out of life he had read to her, not sentence-structure and semicolons.
For you ought to stop twice as long at a semicolon as you do at a comma, and you make the longest stops where there ought to be no stop at all.
Separating semicolons The court considered three different rules of grammar to determine whether the word intent in paragraph 3 could modify the word enter in paragraph 1 and determined that the rules could not apply smoothly because semicolons separated each element.
Originally, Emoji is a Japanese word whi means picture characters; they originated from Emoticons which are typed using punctuation marks such as colons, semicolons, dashes and parentheses.
Power Query will analyze your data and detect a lot of semicolons.
Great craftsmen like Elmore Leonard and Stephen King tell writers to eschew semicolons.
Most of the time, semicolons separate complete thoughts that relate closely to each other.
You are the semicolons in my life, a pause to feel my age.
Extended paragraph-length sentences, well punctuated with semicolons and commas, characterise the topography of the page in the novel, Chaka, and enable Mofolo to create a flowing, lofty narrative, for which he has been admired ever since the book's first appearance in 1925.
In the 1500s, writers tried to develop a system of punctuation based on the length of pauses required by commas, colons, semicolons, and periods.
3) Commas, semicolons, colons, and full stops represented a series of pauses, of relatively increasing duration, such that the comma asks for a smaller pause than the semicolon, which asks for a smaller pause than the colon, and so on.