sensation

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sen·sa·tion

 (sĕn-sā′shən)
n.
1.
a. A perception associated with stimulation of a sense organ or with a specific body condition: the sensation of heat; a visual sensation.
b. The faculty to feel or perceive; physical sensibility: The patient has very little sensation left in the right leg.
c. An indefinite generalized body feeling: a sensation of lightness.
2. A state of heightened interest or emotion: "The anticipation produced in me a sensation somewhat between bliss and fear" (James Weldon Johnson).
3.
a. A state of intense public interest and excitement: "The purser made a sensation as sailors like to do, by predicting a storm" (Evelyn Waugh).
b. A cause of such interest and excitement: The band's new singer is a sensation.

[French, from Old French, from Medieval Latin sēnsātiō, sēnsātiōn-, from Late Latin sēnsātus, gifted with sense; see sensate.]

sensation

(sɛnˈseɪʃən)
n
1. (Physiology) the power of perceiving through the senses
2. (Physiology) a physical condition or experience resulting from the stimulation of one of the sense organs: a sensation of warmth.
3. a general feeling or awareness: a sensation of fear.
4. a state of widespread public excitement: his announcement caused a sensation.
5. anything that causes such a state: your speech was a sensation.
[C17: from Medieval Latin sensātiō, from Late Latin sensātus sensate]
senˈsationless adj

sen•sa•tion

(sɛnˈseɪ ʃən)

n.
1. perception or awareness of stimuli through the senses.
2. a mental condition or physical feeling resulting from stimulation of a sense organ or from internal bodily change, as cold or pain.
3. the faculty of perception of stimuli.
4. a general feeling not directly attributable to any given stimulus, as discomfort, anxiety, or doubt.
5. widespread excitement or interest: The divorce caused a sensation.
6. a cause of such feeling or interest.
[1605–15; < Late Latin sēnsātiō understanding, idea = Latin sēns(us) sense + -ātiō -ation]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sensation - an unelaborated elementary awareness of stimulation; "a sensation of touch"
perception - the process of perceiving
limen, threshold - the smallest detectable sensation
masking - the blocking of one sensation resulting from the presence of another sensation; "he studied auditory masking by pure tones"
visual sensation, vision - the perceptual experience of seeing; "the runners emerged from the trees into his clear vision"; "he had a visual sensation of intense light"
odour, olfactory perception, olfactory sensation, smell, odor - the sensation that results when olfactory receptors in the nose are stimulated by particular chemicals in gaseous form; "she loved the smell of roses"
gustatory perception, gustatory sensation, taste, taste perception, taste sensation - the sensation that results when taste buds in the tongue and throat convey information about the chemical composition of a soluble stimulus; "the candy left him with a bad taste"; "the melon had a delicious taste"
auditory sensation, sound - the subjective sensation of hearing something; "he strained to hear the faint sounds"
synaesthesia, synesthesia - a sensation that normally occurs in one sense modality occurs when another modality is stimulated
2.sensation - someone who is dazzlingly skilled in any fieldsensation - someone who is dazzlingly skilled in any field
expert - a person with special knowledge or ability who performs skillfully
track star - a star runner
3.sensation - a general feeling of excitement and heightened interest; "anticipation produced in me a sensation somewhere between hope and fear"
stir - emotional agitation and excitement
4.sensation - a state of widespread public excitement and interest; "the news caused a sensation"
excitation, fervour, inflammation, excitement, fervor - the state of being emotionally aroused and worked up; "his face was flushed with excitement and his hands trembled"; "he tried to calm those who were in a state of extreme inflammation"
5.sensation - the faculty through which the external world is apprehended; "in the dark he had to depend on touch and on his senses of smell and hearing"
faculty, mental faculty, module - one of the inherent cognitive or perceptual powers of the mind
sense modality, sensory system, modality - a particular sense
sensitivity, sensitiveness, sensibility - (physiology) responsiveness to external stimuli; the faculty of sensation; "sensitivity to pain"

sensation

noun
1. feeling, sense, impression, perception, awareness, consciousness A sensation of burning or tingling may be felt in the hands.
2. excitement, surprise, thrill, stir, scandal, furore, agitation, commotion she caused a sensation at the Montreal Olympics
3. hit, success, wow (slang, chiefly U.S.), crowd puller (informal) the film that turned her into an overnight sensation

sensation

noun
1. The capacity for or an act of responding to a stimulus:
2. A condition of intense public interest or excitement:
Informal: to-do.
Slang: hoo-hah.
3. One that evokes great surprise and admiration:
Idioms: one for the books, the eighth wonder of the world.
Translations
إحْساس بواسِطَة اللمْس، حِسسَبَب للإثارَة، أمْرٌ مُدْهِش ومُثيرشُعور
senzacecítěnípocit
følelsefølesansfornemmelsesensation
sensaatiotunnetuntemus
skynjun, tilfinningtilfinningviîburîur
besivaikantis sensacijųjutimaslabai vykęssensacijasensacingai
izjūtajutoņasajūtasensācija
senzáciavnem
občuteksenzacija
büyük ilgi uyandıran olayduyguheyecan verici bir şeyhis

sensation

[senˈseɪʃən] N
1. (= feeling) → sensación f
to have a dizzy sensationtener (una) sensación de mareo
to lose all sensation in one's armperder la sensibilidad en el brazo
2. (= impression) → sensación f
to have the sensation of doing sthtener la sensación de estar haciendo algo
I had the sensation that I was being watchedtenía la sensación de que me estaban observando
3. (= excitement, success) → sensación f
to be a sensationser un éxito
it was a sensation in New Yorken Nueva York causó sensación
to cause or create a sensationcausar sensación

sensation

[sɛnˈseɪʃən] n
(= ability to feel) → sensation f
a loss of sensation → une perte de sensation
He had no sensation in his right leg
BUT Il ne sentait plus sa jambe droite.
(= feeling) → sensation f
a strange sensation → une étrange sensation
(= great excitement) → sensation f
to be a sensation → faire sensation
The film was a sensation → Le film a fait sensation.
to cause a sensation → faire sensation, créer la sensation

sensation

n
(= feeling)Gefühl nt; (of heat, cold etc)Empfindung f; (of the external world)Sinneseindruck m; a/the sensation of fallingdas Gefühl zu fallen; a sensation of fearein Gefühl ntder Angst, ein Angstgefühl nt; a sensation of hungerein Hungergefühl nt; how can one describe the sensation of touching silk?wie kann man beschreiben, was man beim Berühren von Seide empfindet?; I felt a sensation of being watchedich hatte das Gefühl, beobachtet zu werden
(= great success)Sensation f; to cause or create a sensation(großes) Aufsehen erregen

sensation

:
sensation-seeker
nsensationslüsterner Mensch
sensation-seeking

sensation

[sɛnˈseɪʃn] n
a. (physical feeling, impression) → sensazione f
he is completely without sensation in that leg → ha perso completamente la sensibilità della gamba
b. (excitement) → sensazione f, scalpore m
to be or cause a sensation → fare sensazione, destare scalpore

sensation

(senˈseiʃən) noun
1. the ability to feel through the sense of touch. Cold can cause a loss of sensation in the fingers and toes.
2. a feeling. a sensation of faintness.
3. a general feeling, or a cause, of excitement or horror. The murder caused a sensation; His arrest was the sensation of the week.
senˈsational adjective
1. causing great excitement or horror. a sensational piece of news.
2. very good. The film was sensational.
3. intended to create feelings of excitement, horror etc. That magazine is too sensational for me.
senˈsationally adverb

sen·sa·tion

n. sensación, percepción de una estimulación por un órgano sensorial.

sensation

n sensación f, sensibilidad f; light touch — sensibilidad táctil; — of pain sensación de dolor
References in classic literature ?
It was as if all the agreeable sensations possible to creatures of flesh and blood were heaped up on those black-and-white keys, and he were gloating over them and trickling them through his yellow fingers.
But for the past few days the old gentleman had been upon Edna's hands, and in his society she was becoming acquainted with a new set of sensations.
The sensations produced in the minds of even the white men were different, though uniformly sorrowful.
Civic bred and nurtured as they were, the recurrence of these sensations perplexed and alarmed them.
Tom fretted and chafed awhile in a whirlwind of disorganizing sensations and emotions, and finally said, with something like settled conviction:
They gaily ascended the downs, rejoicing in their own penetration at every glimpse of blue sky; and when they caught in their faces the animating gales of a high south-westerly wind, they pitied the fears which had prevented their mother and Elinor from sharing such delightful sensations.
I felt a drop or two of blood from my head trickle down my neck, and was sensible of somewhat pungent suffering: these sensations for the time predominated over fear, and I received him in frantic sort.
The sun shone yellow on its grey head, reminding me of summer; and I cannot say why, but all at once a gush of child's sensations flowed into my heart.
Magdalen lingered a little on the lawn, to feel all the happiness of her new sensations -- then turned away toward the shrubbery to enjoy the higher luxury of communicating them.
We made merry in the little parlour, where the Book of Martyrs, unthumbed since my time, was laid out upon the desk as of old, and where I now turned over its terrific pictures, remembering the old sensations they had awakened, but not feeling them.
which recalled her to herself, and reminded her the sensations which she felt were not and could not be mutual.
Finding her own sensations exactly like those described in the book as symptoms of the direst diseases, she put it by in alarm, and took up a novel, which was free from the fault she had found in the lectures, inasmuch as none of the emotions it described in the least resembled any she had ever experienced.