settledness

settledness

(ˈsɛtəldnəs)
n
the quality or condition of being settled
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Mansfield Park and Downton Abbey each work as metonyms for an entire way of life that must be preserved, a gracious life of nostalgically appealing settledness, belonging, and certainty.
There's a real continuity and settledness around the club, sprinkle a goalscorer like Jelavic on top and things are good.
The providers conform to a stereotypical image of providers in many ways: age, education level, formal instruction in English before and after arrival in Australia, degree of settledness, bi-national self-identification and even early signs that some are using English as much as their first language with the next generation.
The absence of backward branching represents the settledness of the past.
The peoples' tendency toward settledness and a desire to "go it alone" lead to systems of defeat that can only be overturned by a dynamic agency outside those systems.
The church has been unmoored and should joyfully take leave of the settledness of Constantinian social arrangements that gave it privilege and power.
The three main sections of this volume: "Diaspora and Settledness," "Jewish Experience and the Holocaust," and "Literature and Cultural Exchange," are preceded by the foreword and introduction, as well as the opus "Occupying Landscape We Occupy Story We Occupy Landscape" by western Canadian writer Robert Kroetsch.
requiring settledness (al-istiqrar) but on the condition that this [earthly] body (al-jism) is found existing in its natural place (makanihi al-tabi i) which is the earth (al-ard), while the motion [of this body] toward it [the earth] is on the condition that this body is outside its [natural] place.
But in the present crisis the author wonders "Whether the hair-brain'dness of the present world, will give leasure enough to most, to dwell upon any thing at all, much less to practise Heroical Vertues with such a constant settledness as is necessary, being the chief intention of the Authour (as I conceive) in writing of this Romance.
legal philosopher, Ronald Dworkin, "emphasizes the possibility of revision too much and the likeliness of settledness too little .
As far as I am concerned, it is not new immigration that worries and frightens white Europeans most -- it is the size and settledness, the permanence, of those already here.
He invoked seventeenth-century pastorals and georgics--products of and imaginative escapes from a time of political and economic instability--not because he shared in the "nostalgic longing for pastoral settledness," but rather "to signal the artifice of such fantasies and desires" (109).