severance

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sev·er·ance

 (sĕv′ər-əns, sĕv′rəns)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of severing.
b. The condition of being severed.
2. Separation; partition.
3. Severance pay.

severance

(ˈsɛvərəns)
n
1. the act of severing or state of being severed
2. a separation
3. (Law) law the division into separate parts of a joint estate, contract, etc

sev•er•ance

(ˈsɛv ər əns, ˈsɛv rəns)

n.
1. the act of severing or the state of being severed.
2. a breaking off, as of a friendship.
3. Law. a division of liabilities, provisions, etc., into parts; removal of a part from the whole.
4. Also called sev′erance pay`. money, exclusive of wages, etc., paid to an employee who is dismissed for reasons beyond the employee's control.
[1375–1425; < Anglo-French; see sever, -ance]

severance

1. the act or process of severing or separating.
2. the state or condition of being severed or separated, as in the ending of a relationship.
See also: Separation
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.severance - a personal or social separation (as between opposing factions)severance - a personal or social separation (as between opposing factions); "they hoped to avoid a break in relations"
schism - the formal separation of a church into two churches or the withdrawal of one group over doctrinal differences
breakup, separation, detachment - coming apart
2.severance - the act of severing
cutting, cut - the act of cutting something into parts; "his cuts were skillful"; "his cutting of the cake made a terrible mess"

severance

noun
The act or an instance of separating one thing from another:
Translations
قَطْع ، فَصْل، فَصْم
amputacepřerušení
adskillelse
ero
elvágás
skilnaîur
loslossnijdenontslagvergoedingscheidingzijn

severance

[ˈsevərəns]
A. Nruptura f (Ind) → despido m
B. CPD severance pay Nindemnización f por despido

severance

[ˈsɛvərəns] n [relations] → rupture fseverance package nindemnités fpl de départseverance pay nindemnité f de licenciement

severance

n
(= cutting through)Durchtrennen nt; (violently) → Durchschlagen nt; (= cutting off)Abtrennen nt; (violently) → Abschlagen nt; (fig: = breaking off) (of ties)Lösen nt; (of relations, links, friendship)Abbruch m; (of communications)Unterbrechung f
(also severance package, Econ) → Abfindung f, → Abfindungspaket nt

severance

[ˈsɛvərns] n (frm) (of relations) → rottura

sever

(ˈsevə) verb
1. to put an end to. He severed relations with his family.
2. to cut or break off. His arm was severed in the accident.
ˈseverance noun
References in periodicals archive ?
This rule applies in any week that the departing employee collects a severance benefit that equals or exceeds the maximum unemployment insurance weekly benefit (currently $420).
It added: "They comprise a severance benefit payable to Mr Tierney and a payment due to the Ervia Defined Benefit Scheme to cover post-retirement pension entitlements, both arising from the terms of his Dublin City Council employment arrangements.
Suppose employee Bob Cratchit is terminated on December 24, 2008 and is entitled to an immediate severance benefit of $350 (two weeks' pay).
For eligible participants who are among a group of about 360 key employees, the severance benefit will range from 15 months of base salary to double the sum of base salary and a target bonus.
Employees will receive a severance benefit package.
With these options, agents could choose to become exclusive agents and continue to represent Allstate; become exclusive agents to receive an economic interest in their book of business, then sell it; or leave the company with an enhanced severance benefit.
For example, employers are limited in how much (if anything) they can deduct for contributions to fund a severance benefit.
One week's salary per year of service is the most common tenure-based severance benefit for exempt and non-exempt employees, while two weeks is the median for officers and other executives.
Additional retirement income can be provided as a severance benefit via a simple written agreement with the executive.
At first glance, this clause seems like another CEO give-away, because Morrison can voluntarily terminate and force the acquiring company to pay his severance benefit.
In a similar cash management strategy using a DB program, another large firm with more than 5,000 employees used its plan to provide a more generous severance benefit than would otherwise have been possible.
Where those benefits are provided, the most common severance benefit payable is three times salary plus annual bonus (almost 70 percent of the cases), followed by two times salary plus bonus.