sewer

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Related to Sewers: Combined sewer

sew·er 1

 (so͞o′ər)
n.
An artificial, usually underground conduit for carrying off sewage or rainwater.

[Middle English, from Anglo-Norman sewere, from Vulgar Latin *exaquāria : Latin ex-, ex- + Latin aquāria, feminine of aquārius, pertaining to water (from aqua, water; see akw-ā- in Indo-European roots).]

sew·er 2

 (so͞o′ər)
n.
A medieval servant who supervised the serving of meals.

[Middle English, from Anglo-Norman asseour, from asseer, to seat guests, from Latin assidēre, to sit down : ad-, ad- + sedēre, to sit; see sed- in Indo-European roots.]

sew·er 3

 (sō′ər)
n.
One that sews: a sewer of fine clothing.

sewer

(ˈsuːə)
n
(Civil Engineering) a drain or pipe, esp one that is underground, used to carry away surface water or sewage
vb
(Civil Engineering) (tr) to provide with sewers
[C15: from Old French esseveur, from essever to drain, from Vulgar Latin exaquāre (unattested), from Latin ex-1 + aqua water]

sewer

(ˈsəʊə)
n
(Knitting & Sewing) a person or thing that sews

sewer

(ˈsuːə)
n
(Historical Terms) (in medieval England) a servant of high rank in charge of the serving of meals and the seating of guests
[C14: shortened from Anglo-French asseour, from Old French asseoir to cause to sit, from Latin assidēre, from sedēre to sit]

sew•er1

(ˈsu ər)

n.
an artificial conduit, usu. underground, for carrying off waste water and refuse, as in a town or city.
[1375–1425; late Middle English suer(e) < dial. Old French se(u)wiere overflow channel (compare Old French ess(e)ouer(e) ditch) < Vulgar Latin *exaquāria= Latin ex- ex-1 + aqu(a) water + -āria, feminine of -ārius -ary; see -er2]
sew′er•less, adj.
sew′er•like`, adj.

sew•er2

(ˈsoʊ ər)

n.
a person or thing that sews.
[1350–1400]

sewer


Past participle: sewered
Gerund: sewering

Imperative
sewer
sewer
Present
I sewer
you sewer
he/she/it sewers
we sewer
you sewer
they sewer
Preterite
I sewered
you sewered
he/she/it sewered
we sewered
you sewered
they sewered
Present Continuous
I am sewering
you are sewering
he/she/it is sewering
we are sewering
you are sewering
they are sewering
Present Perfect
I have sewered
you have sewered
he/she/it has sewered
we have sewered
you have sewered
they have sewered
Past Continuous
I was sewering
you were sewering
he/she/it was sewering
we were sewering
you were sewering
they were sewering
Past Perfect
I had sewered
you had sewered
he/she/it had sewered
we had sewered
you had sewered
they had sewered
Future
I will sewer
you will sewer
he/she/it will sewer
we will sewer
you will sewer
they will sewer
Future Perfect
I will have sewered
you will have sewered
he/she/it will have sewered
we will have sewered
you will have sewered
they will have sewered
Future Continuous
I will be sewering
you will be sewering
he/she/it will be sewering
we will be sewering
you will be sewering
they will be sewering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been sewering
you have been sewering
he/she/it has been sewering
we have been sewering
you have been sewering
they have been sewering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been sewering
you will have been sewering
he/she/it will have been sewering
we will have been sewering
you will have been sewering
they will have been sewering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been sewering
you had been sewering
he/she/it had been sewering
we had been sewering
you had been sewering
they had been sewering
Conditional
I would sewer
you would sewer
he/she/it would sewer
we would sewer
you would sewer
they would sewer
Past Conditional
I would have sewered
you would have sewered
he/she/it would have sewered
we would have sewered
you would have sewered
they would have sewered
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sewer - a waste pipe that carries away sewage or surface watersewer - a waste pipe that carries away sewage or surface water
drainpipe, waste pipe, drain - a pipe through which liquid is carried away
sewage system, sewage works, sewer system - facility consisting of a system of sewers for carrying off liquid and solid sewage
2.sewer - someone who sews; "a sewer of fine gowns"
baster, tacker - a sewer who fastens a garment with long loose stitches
needleworker - someone who does work (as sewing or embroidery) with a needle
sewing-machine operator - someone who sews by operating a sewing machine
tucker - a sewer who tucks
3.sewer - misfortune resulting in lost effort or moneysewer - misfortune resulting in lost effort or money; "his career was in the gutter"; "all that work went down the sewer"; "pensions are in the toilet"
bad luck, ill luck, tough luck, misfortune - an unfortunate state resulting from unfavorable outcomes
Translations
أَنْبُوبٌ تـَحْتَ الَأرْضأنْبوب لِمِياه المَجاريخائِط، خَيّاط
kanálkrejčíodtokový kanálšvadlena
kloakkloakledningsyer
viemäri
kaalizacijski odvod
holræsisaumari; saumakona
下水
하수구
kanalizācijas caurule
odtokový kanál
odvodna cev
kloak
ท่อน้ำเสีย
cống rãnh

sewer

[ˈsjʊəʳ] Nalcantarilla f, albañal m, cloaca f
to have a mind like a sewertener la mente podrida

sewer

[ˈsuːər] négout m

sewer

1
nNäher(in) m(f)

sewer

2
n (= pipe)Abwasserleitung for -rohr nt; (= main sewer)Abwasserkanal m; (fig: = smelly place) → Kloake f; sewer gasFaulschlammgas nt; sewer ratWanderratte f; he has a mind like a sewer (inf)er hat eine schmutzige or dreckige (inf)Fantasie or Phantasie

sewer

[ˈsjʊəʳ] nfogna

sewer1

(ˈsjuə) noun
an underground pipe or channel for carrying away water etc from drains.
ˈsewage (-idʒ) noun
waste matter (carried away in sewers).
sewage farm
a place where sewage is treated and disposed of.

sewer

أَنْبُوبٌ تـَحْتَ الَأرْض kanál kloak Abwasserkanal υπόνομος alcantarilla viemäri égout kaalizacijski odvod fogna 下水 하수구 riool kloakk ściek costureiro сточная труба kloak ท่อน้ำเสีย lağım borusu cống rãnh 排污管
References in classic literature ?
As one who long in populous City pent, Where Houses thick and Sewers annoy the Aire, Forth issuing on a Summers Morn, to breathe Among the pleasant Villages and Farmes Adjoynd, from each thing met conceaves delight, The smell of Grain, or tedded Grass, or Kine, Or Dairie, each rural sight, each rural sound; If chance with Nymphlike step fair Virgin pass, What pleasing seemd, for her now pleases more, She most, and in her look summs all Delight.
As I made the transit of the CARRE, I observed, as usual, the band of sewers surrounding Mdlle.
I needn't be so proud of having been down all these sewers that I should brag about it to the little boys in the street.
Picture the squalid misery of their brutish existence, dragged on from year to year in the narrow, noisome room where, huddled like vermin in sewers, they welter, and sicken, and sleep; where dirt-grimed children scream and fight and sluttish, shrill-voiced women cuff, and curse, and nag; where the street outside teems with roaring filth and the house around is a bedlam of riot and stench.
Under the streets, in the sewers, in the wires, in the telephones, there is something alive; is that what you mean?
Broad streets, well graded, were made, with sewers and water-pipes ready laid, and macadamized from his own quarries.
Let the sewers serve and the minstrels play, while we drain a cup to the brave days that are before us in the south
Do you know how drains are made below the streets, and wherein these human sewers differ, except in being always stagnant?
In the way of movement and human life, there was the hasty rattle of a cab or coach, its driver protected by a waterproof cap over his head and shoulders; the forlorn figure of an old man, who seemed to have crept out of some subterranean sewer, and was stooping along the kennel, and poking the wet rubbish with a stick, in quest of rusty nails; a merchant or two, at the door of the post-office, together with an editor and a miscellaneous politician, awaiting a dilatory mail; a few visages of retired sea-captains at the window of an insurance office, looking out vacantly at the vacant street, blaspheming at the weather, and fretting at the dearth as well of public news as local gossip.
Their children were not as well as they had been at home; but how could they know that there was no sewer to their house, and that the drainage of fifteen years was in a cesspool under it?
She was a king's leman and did climb to that splendid eminence by her own unholpen merit from the sewer where she was born.
While the Saxon was plunged in these painful reflections, the door of their prison opened, and gave entrance to a sewer, holding his white rod of office.