Shango


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Shango

(ˈʃæŋɡəʊ)
n
(Other Non-Christian Religions)
a. a W African religious cult surviving in some parts of the Caribbean
b. (as modifier): Shango ritual.
[Yoruba]
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
A unique connection between telecom services and daily task automation has been made by Shango via its Integrated Digital Services Platform and the Shango Actions mobile app.
com)-- A unique connection between telecom services and daily task automation has been made by Shango via its' Integrated Digital Services Platform and the Shango Actions mobile app.
10, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- A unique connection between telecom services and daily task automation has been made by Shango via its' Integrated Digital Services Platform and the Shango Actions mobile app.
Dion Shango will take over Boegman's southern Africa CEO role, the first black African to be appointed in this role within PwC in southern Africa.
Van Kempen (Geschiedenis 779) verklaar die oorsprong van die naam as volg: "Het eerste deel van die naam verwijst naar de Ashanti koningin-moeder Yaa Ashantewa die in 1900 in opstand kwam tegen de Britten, 'Sangodare' is de naam van een Shango priester; Shango vernoemd naar de Yoruba god van de donder, is een Afrikaans gebaseerde religie--vergelijkbaar met winti--die op Trinidad gepraktiseerd wordt.
The ritual sacrifice of the fowl is also connected with the Shango cult in Trinidad and Obeah in Barbados, both of which are connected to religious forms found in West Africa.
Such works include: Charles Alston Walking (1958), Jeff Donaldson Aunt Jemima & the Pillsbury Doughboy (1963) and Wives of Shango (1968) OBAC and The Wall of Respect (1967), Elizabeth Catlett Negro-es Bello II (1969), David Hammons Injustice Case (1970), Betye Saar The Liberation of Aunt Jemima (1972), and contemporary quilter Yvonne Wells in Being In Total Control of Herself
A worried Shango Devi, wife of Karnail Chand, holding her nine-month old baby boy close, believes that her son has not grown up like other children of his age.
The black half holds an axe in his hand and has two faces that resemble the symbol of Shango, a pantheon of deities of Candomble.
In Haiti, for example, among the Vodun worshippers we find the same African gods, Dumballa, Shango, and the like.
But the problem endures among foreign and Cuban priests when they witness church-goers addressing at the Virgin of Charity as Ochun, the Virgin of Mercy as Obatala, the black Virgin of Regla as Yemaya and Santa Barbara as Shango, and praying to St.