sharecropping

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Related to Sharecropping system: 13th Amendment

share·crop

 (shâr′krŏp′)
v. share·cropped, share·crop·ping, share·crops
v.intr.
To work as a sharecropper.
v.tr.
To work (land) or grow (crops) as a sharecropper.

sharecropping

(ˈʃɛəˌkrɒpɪŋ)
n
(Agriculture) US the practice of cultivating farmland as a sharecropper
Translations

sharecropping

[ˈʃɛəˌkrɒpɪŋ] N (esp US) → aparcería f
References in periodicals archive ?
Under the previous Japanese-enforced sharecropping system, most farmers had to pay as much as 70 percent of their annual crops to the landowners, who represented only a tiny fraction of the population.
A few spirituals were sung before an old gentleman called Blue bravely volunteered a song he claimed to have composed that afternoon in the field, one that addressed the iniquities of the sharecropping system.
Free labor became little more than slave labor as noted in the poverty that continued for those in the sharecropping system, and in domestic labor.
Second, the plan aimed at freeing tribal members from the sharecropping system.
For this reason, as far as the Zolfino bean is concerned, it is necessary to consider the relationship between the self-sustaining sharecropping system, where the Zolfino bean originally belonged, and the contemporary heritage policies where it has been introduced.
Alexander's discussion of "debtors' prison" makes the most compelling case for the connections she makes by recalling the sharecropping system that left African Americans in perpetual debt and unable to break out of a lifetime of servitude.
Lucia's sharecropping system, styles of dress and fashion, and flower festivals.
In addition to its political acumen, this novel offers a variegated set of characters, many of whom deepen Jimas insights into the entrenched injustices of the sharecropping system.
The intense labor of the sharecropping system required entire families to work in the fields and even necessitated that black women, who generally possessed greater formal education, "manage household finances and negotiate year-end settlements with the landlord," according to Robin D.
The sharecropping system, for all its faults, helped keep people fed, but even it began to break down.
On the other hand, more farmers under the sharecropping system obtained funds from relations compared with the other two systems.
The book provides a detailed exploration of the consequences of the political exclusion of African Americans, the sharecropping system, and the resistance of white elites on the current economic and political situation in the Mississippi Delta.