shareholder

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share·hold·er

 (shâr′hōl′dər)
n.
One that owns a share or shares of a company or investment fund. Also called shareowner.

share′hold′ing n.

shareholder

(ˈʃɛəˌhəʊldə)
n
(Stock Exchange) the owner of one or more shares in a company

share•hold•er

(ˈʃɛərˌhoʊl dər)

n.
a person, company, etc., that owns shares of stock in a company or corporation.
[1785–95]

shareholder

stockholder
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.shareholder - someone who holds shares of stock in a corporation
investor - someone who commits capital in order to gain financial returns
stockholder of record - the stockholder whose name is registered on the books of the corporation as owning the shares at a particular time
Translations
مُسَاهِممُساهِم
akcionář
aktionær
osakkeenomistaja
dioničar
részvényes
hluthafi
株主
주주
akcionár
aktieägare
ผู้ถือหุ้น
cổ đông

shareholder

[ˈʃɛəˌhəʊldəʳ] Naccionista mf

shareholder

[ˈʃɛərhəʊldər]
nactionnaire mf
modif [vote] → des actionnaires

shareholder

[ˈʃɛəˌhəʊldəʳ] nazionista m/f

share

(ʃeə) noun
1. one of the parts of something that is divided among several people etc. We all had a share of the cake; We each paid our share of the bill.
2. the part played by a person in something done etc by several people etc. I had no share in the decision.
3. a fixed sum of money invested in a business company by a ˈshareholder.
verb
1. (usually with among, ~between, ~with) to divide among a number of people. We shared the money between us.
2. to have, use etc (something that another person has or uses); to allow someone to use (something one has or owns). The students share a sitting-room; The little boy hated sharing his toys.
3. (sometimes with in) to have a share of with someone else. He wouldn't let her share the cost of the taxi.
ˈshareholder noun
a person who owns shares in a business company.
share and share alike
with everyone having an equal share. We divided the money between us, share and share alike.

shareholder

مُسَاهِم akcionář aktionær Aktionär μέτοχος accionista osakkeenomistaja actionnaire dioničar azionista 株主 주주 aandeelhouder aksjonær udziałowiec acionista акционер aktieägare ผู้ถือหุ้น hisse sahibi cổ đông 股东
References in periodicals archive ?
In this Article I discuss this fictional undiversified shareholder concept and compare it with three alternative fictional characterizations that differ from it and among themselves only in the extent of assumed investor diversification, and which could each serve this same analytical function.
My conclusion is that despite its advantages of greatly simplifying directors' decision making we should discard the fictional undiversified shareholder concept for two reasons.
I also conclude that if corporation investment decisions are best pursued through the use of a fictional shareholder concept, rather than through attempts by directors to ascertain and satisfy to the extent possible the conflicting preferences of their corporation's actual shareholders and perhaps other stakeholders as well--a question discussed but not resolved in this Article--then the fictional diversified shareholder concept, despite its significant implementation difficulties, is the preferred alternative among those here considered.
If directors are going to continue to embrace this norm and implement it through the use of a fictional shareholder concept that obviously cannot be an accurate representation of the circumstances of every actual shareholder, what are the optimal contours of that concept?
Instead I will assume the board has decided to simplify its analysis by first embracing a generic, fictional shareholder concept and then choosing the option that would be regarded as wealth-maximizing by that hypothetical shareholder.
I will first discuss the traditional fictional shareholder concept that is currently widely embraced by directors.
The fictional undiversified shareholder concept is simply the personification of shares of the corporation's common stock.
Let me preface my discussion of the fictional diversified shareholder concept with a short digression on the portfolio theory aspects of modern finance theory.
While this fictional diversified shareholder concept obviously does not accurately reflect the circumstances of each actual shareholder of a particular corporation, given the reality of widespread investor diversification, it is nevertheless likely to be a somewhat more accurate approximation to the actual circumstances of public corporation shareholders than is the fictional undiversified shareholder concept.
As noted above, these five different variations on the generic fictional shareholder concept differ among themselves only with regard to the extent and nature of assumed shareholder diversification.
Consider a board of directors committed to the norm of shareholder wealth maximization, and whose members each embrace a fictional undiversified shareholder concept of the shareholders to whom they hold themselves accountable.
One economically undesirable consequence of directors embracing the fictional undiversified shareholder concept, discussed in the academic literature (33) and addressed to a limited extent by the case law as well, (34) is that it may lead to corporations making inefficient investments that have very low or even negative overall expected returns when the corporation's preferred shareholders and bondholders, as well as the common shareholders, are taken into account.