Shavian


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Sha·vi·an

 (shā′vē-ən)
adj.
Of, relating to, or characteristic of George Bernard Shaw or his works: Shavian wit.
n.
An admirer or disciple of George Bernard Shaw.

[From Shavius, Latinization of the name Shaw.]

Shavian

(ˈʃeɪvɪən)
adj
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) of, relating to, or like George Bernard Shaw, his works, ideas, etc
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) an admirer of Shaw or his works
ˈShavianism n

Sha•vi•an

(ˈʃeɪ vi ən)

adj.
1. of, pertaining to, or characteristic of George Bernard Shaw or his works.
n.
2. a specialist in Shavian literature.
[1905–10; Shav- (Latinization of Shaw) + -ian]
Sha′vi•an•ism, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Shavian - an admirer of G. B. Shaw or his works
admirer, booster, protagonist, supporter, champion, friend - a person who backs a politician or a team etc.; "all their supporters came out for the game"; "they are friends of the library"
Adj.1.Shavian - of or relating to George Bernard Shaw or his works
Translations

Shavian

[ˈʃeɪvɪən] ADJshaviano, típico de G. B. Shaw

Shavian

adjshawsch
References in periodicals archive ?
The Shavian association in Measure for Measure has been already suggested by the critics, e.
The Florida Bernard Shaw Series has been a mainstay of Shavian scholarship since 1999.
However, the brief conclusion fails to venture beyond thematics (how the settings serve an individual play's meaning) into what, taken together, they might reveal about Shavian dramaturgical form or even heretofore underexplored aspects of the playwright's thinking.
McInerney (who compares Shavian heroines to a number of contemporary powerful women, including Hillary Clinton, Oprah Winfrey, and the late Margaret Thatcher); however, four of the eleven essays in Shaw and Feminisms discuss Mrs Warren's Profession at length, and there is also a repeated focus on The Philanderer, Misalliance, Saint Joan, and The Millionairess in the volume.
The show thus set out the full, bewildering plethora of Shavian themes, which range from the perennial big topics (sex, religion, myth, the unconscious, cultism, consumerism, advertising, US politics, history, and culture) to a tsunami of minutiae: obscure rock groups, comics, holy imagery seen in pizza toppings, and the complex rigmarole of "Oism," Shaw's homegrown, Mormon-style feminist cult.
Cukor had already explored the Shavian Pygmalion in Born Yesterday (1950) and A Star is Born (1954), a plot that was explored indirectly in hundreds of films, from The Red Shoes (Michael Powell & Emeric Pressburger, 1948) to Pretty Woman (Garry Marshall, 1990).
As the Congress prepares for its weekend chintan shivir ( an oxymoron for a party that shows complete lack of thinking), it needs to recollect the Shavian aphorism and reflect on it.
The last winner not to have run in Group 1 company that season was Shavian in 1990.
2) These correspondences are valuable because none from Charrington have survived, but they are nevertheless one-way Shavian monologues which present potential pitfalls in interpretation.
Hampson first shows how "The Return," an implicitly Ibsenesque and Shavian novella, is structured like a three-act play; this persuasive reading draws out "the conflict between sham sentiments and real feelings [that are] played out in Hervey's internal monologues and in the dialogues with his wife" (62).
Either Schwartz is deliberately avoiding points that have been made by other scholars or the Shavian reference complicates his treatment of the survival of the fittest in connection with OSP.
The Shavian wit returns to the Asolo stage once more in a production directed by Tony winner Tony Walton.