Shaw


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Anna Howard Shaw

Shaw

 (shô), Anna Howard 1847-1919.
British-born American physician and minister who was president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association (1904-1915).

Shaw

, Artie Originally Arthur Jacob Arshawsky. 1910-2004.
American clarinetist, band leader, composer, and arranger whose swing band, formed in 1937, exemplified the big band sound.

Shaw

, George Bernard 1856-1950.
Irish-born British playwright, essayist, and critic. A member of the Fabian Society, a group of writers committed to promoting socialism, he wrote plays of iconoclastic social criticism, including Arms and the Man (1894), Pygmalion (1913), and Saint Joan (1923). He won the 1925 Nobel Prize for literature.

Shaw

, Henry Wheeler Pen name Josh Bil·lings  (bĭl′ĭngz) 1818-1885.
American humorist noted for his essays on rural life, characterized by intentional misspellings and published annually in the Farmers' Allminax (1869-1880).

Shaw

, Robert Gould 1837-1863.
American Union colonel who was killed leading his regiment of African-American soldiers in the assault on Fort Wagner in South Carolina.

shaw

(ʃɔː)
n
(Forestry) archaic or dialect a small wood; thicket; copse
[Old English sceaga; related to Old Norse skagi tip, skaga to jut out, skōgr forest, skegg beard]

shaw

(ʃɔː)
vb
to show
n
1. a show
2. (Agriculture) the part of a potato plant that is above ground

Shaw

(ʃɔː)
n
1. (Biography) Artie, original name Arthur Arshawsky. 1910–2004, US jazz clarinetist, band leader, and composer
2. (Biography) George Bernard, often known as GBS. 1856–1950, Irish dramatist and critic, in England from 1876. He was an active socialist and became a member of the Fabian Society but his major works are effective as satiric attacks rather than political tracts. These include Arms and the Man (1894), Candida (1894), Man and Superman (1903), Major Barbara (1905), Pygmalion (1913), Back to Methuselah (1921), and St Joan (1923): Nobel prize for literature 1925
3. (Biography) Richard Norman. 1831–1912, English architect
4. (Biography) Thomas Edward. the name assumed by (T. E.) Lawrence after 1927

Shaw

(ʃɔ)

n.
1. George Bernard, 1856–1950, British writer, born in Ireland: Nobel prize 1925.
2. Robert (Lawson), 1916–99, U.S. conductor.
3. Thomas Edward, Lawrence, Thomas Edward.

Shaw

 a thicket or small wood; a tuft of trees—Johnson, 1755.
Examples: shaws of coral and pearly sands, 1721; a shaw of wood, 1462.

shaw


Past participle: shawed
Gerund: shawing

Imperative
shaw
shaw
Present
I shaw
you shaw
he/she/it shaws
we shaw
you shaw
they shaw
Preterite
I shawed
you shawed
he/she/it shawed
we shawed
you shawed
they shawed
Present Continuous
I am shawing
you are shawing
he/she/it is shawing
we are shawing
you are shawing
they are shawing
Present Perfect
I have shawed
you have shawed
he/she/it has shawed
we have shawed
you have shawed
they have shawed
Past Continuous
I was shawing
you were shawing
he/she/it was shawing
we were shawing
you were shawing
they were shawing
Past Perfect
I had shawed
you had shawed
he/she/it had shawed
we had shawed
you had shawed
they had shawed
Future
I will shaw
you will shaw
he/she/it will shaw
we will shaw
you will shaw
they will shaw
Future Perfect
I will have shawed
you will have shawed
he/she/it will have shawed
we will have shawed
you will have shawed
they will have shawed
Future Continuous
I will be shawing
you will be shawing
he/she/it will be shawing
we will be shawing
you will be shawing
they will be shawing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been shawing
you have been shawing
he/she/it has been shawing
we have been shawing
you have been shawing
they have been shawing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been shawing
you will have been shawing
he/she/it will have been shawing
we will have been shawing
you will have been shawing
they will have been shawing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been shawing
you had been shawing
he/she/it had been shawing
we had been shawing
you had been shawing
they had been shawing
Conditional
I would shaw
you would shaw
he/she/it would shaw
we would shaw
you would shaw
they would shaw
Past Conditional
I would have shawed
you would have shawed
he/she/it would have shawed
we would have shawed
you would have shawed
they would have shawed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.shaw - United States clarinetist and leader of a swing band (1910-2004)Shaw - United States clarinetist and leader of a swing band (1910-2004)
2.shaw - United States humorist who wrote about rural life (1818-1885)Shaw - United States humorist who wrote about rural life (1818-1885)
3.shaw - United States physician and suffragist (1847-1919)Shaw - United States physician and suffragist (1847-1919)
4.shaw - British playwright (born in Ireland)Shaw - British playwright (born in Ireland); founder of the Fabian Society (1856-1950)
References in classic literature ?
Shaw in Newport, and told me, in case my money did not serve me to New Bedford, to stop in Newport and obtain further assistance; but upon our
Typee' was dedicated to Chief Justice Lemuel Shaw of Massachusetts, an old friendship between the author's family and that of Justice Shaw having been renewed about this time.
Angus Shaw, one of the principal partners of the Northwest Company, announcing the coming of the Phoebe and Isaac Todd, "to take and destroy everything American on the northwest coast.
High Pardons Wood, Lower Pardons, Suttons, Dutton's Shaw, Reuben's Ghyll, Maxey's Ghyll, and both the Oak Hangers?
Here there lies a grove of trees, marked as the `Ragged Shaw,' and on the farther side stretches a great rolling moor, Lower Gill Moor, extending for ten miles and sloping gradually upward.
Early in the year 1897 I received a letter inviting me to deliver an address at the dedication of the Robert Gould Shaw monument in Boston.
Shaw, a busy-looking gentleman, said," How do you do, my dear?
Thirty years ago Ramon Gallegos, William Shaw, George W.
Come," she went on, springing to her feet, and smoothing down her rumpled frock, "let us walk through the shaw together, and we may come upon Bertrand with the horses.
Through this same portal, within these very marble halls, had Gray and Chamberlin and Kitchener and Shaw, perhaps, come and gone with the other great ones of the past.
Shaw was laughed at for stating that "the flesh of the lion is in great esteem having no small affinity with veal, both in colour, taste, and flavour.
My dear Lavinia, you are thinking of 'Sea-green Shaw,' so called from the extraordinary liveries he adopted for his servants in the year when he was sheriff.