sherlock

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sher·lock

also Sher·lock  (shûr′lŏk′)
n.
A detective.

[After Sherlock Holmes, detective in stories by Arthur Conan Doyle.]

sherlock

(ˈʃɜːˌlɒk)
n
a detective
vb
to investigate (something)
[after Sherlock Holmes, fictional detective]

sher•lock

(ˈʃɜr lɒk)

n. (often cap.)
1. a detective.
2. a person adept at solving mysteries, esp. by using insight and logical deduction.
[1900–05; after Sherlock Holmes, fictitious detective created by Arthur Conan Doyle]
Sher•lock′i•an, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sherlock - someone who can be employed as a detective to collect informationsherlock - someone who can be employed as a detective to collect information
detective - an investigator engaged or employed in obtaining information not easily available to the public
hotel detective, house detective, house dick - a private detective employed by a hotel or retail store
inquiry agent - a private detective
store detective - a private detective employed by a merchant to stop pilferage
References in classic literature ?
The house was just such as I had pictured it from Sherlock Holmes' succinct description, but the locality appeared to be less private than I expected.
he cried, grasping Sherlock Holmes by either shoulder and looking eagerly into his face.
Sherlock Holmes, who was usually very late in the mornings, save upon those not infrequent occasions when he was up all night, was seated at the breakfast table.
I laughed incredulously as Sherlock Holmes leaned back in his settee and blew little wavering rings of smoke up to the ceiling.
And so it happened that an hour or so later I found myself in the corner of a first-class carriage flying along en route for Exeter, while Sherlock Holmes, with his sharp, eager face framed in his ear-flapped travelling-cap, dipped rapidly into the bundle of fresh papers which he had procured at Paddington.
As Sherlock Holmes replaced the half-crown which he had drawn from his pocket, a fierce-looking elderly man strode out from the gate with a hunting-crop swinging in his hand.
It can be imagined that my close intimacy with Sherlock Holmes had interested me deeply in crime, and that after his disappearance I never failed to read with care the various problems which came before the public.
When I turned again, Sherlock Holmes was standing smiling at me across my study table.
Oh, he rates my assistance too highly," said Sherlock Holmes, lightly.
You don't know Sherlock Holmes yet," he said; "perhaps you would not care for him as a constant companion.
Now we have the Sherlock Holmes' test, and there will no longer be any difficulty.
I should do so," Sherlock Holmes remarked impatiently.