sindonology

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sindonology

(ˌsɪndənˈɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Theology) the study of the shroud that the body of Christ is thought to have been wrapped in

sindonology

the study of fabric artifacts, especially the supposed burial shroud of Christ. — sindonologist, n.
See also: Christ
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References in periodicals archive ?
1933: More than 25,000 queued to see the Shroud of Turin when it went on show to the public for the first time in 400 years at Turin Cathedral.
1933: The Shroud of Turin went on show to the public for the first time in 400 years.
IT is a matter of faith for Christians that the Shroud of Turin was wrapped around the body of Jesus after he was crucified.
Mechanical engineers Fanti and Malfi assemble evidence from a number of sources to argue that the famous Shroud of Turin, which many believe wrapped the body of the crucified Jesus, does indeed date to the first century AD.
1978: The Shroud of Turin went on show for the first time on the high altar at St John's Cathedral in Turin.
1978: The Shroud of Turin went on show for the first time BORN Sean Connery, actor, 85 Frederick Forsyth, novelist, 77 Martin Amis, author, 67 Gene Simmons, rock musician (Kiss), 66 Elvis Costello (Declan MacManus), rock musician, 61 Tim Burton, film director, 57 Billy Ray Cyrus, singer, 54 Joanne Whalley, actress, 51 Claudia Schiffer, supermodel and actress, 45 Blake Lively, actress, 28 Ray Quinn, actor, singer and dancer, 27
The faithful are invited to a public viewing of a life-size replica of the Shroud of Turin at the St.
Francis also spent time June 21 praying before the Shroud of Turin, the famous burial cloth that contains an image of what appears to be a crucified man that some believe was Jesus.
A letter written in 1977 claimed that Lennon drew the shroud after taking drugs and seeing an apparition of the Shroud of Turin.
A program about the Shroud of Turin will be held at 7 p.
During the exhibition and art event You Belong to Me: Art and Ethics of Presences, which celebrated artists who turn their audiences into more than spectators, Aloha created the piece, which brings together interactions in beauty parlors, child molestation stories, and a parody of the Shroud of Turin.
London, Apr 3 ( ANI ): A new analysis of the Shroud of Turin suggests that whoever created it thought crucifixion involved the hands being nailed above the head.