Shrovetide


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Shrove·tide

 (shrōv′tīd′)
n.
The three days, Shrove Sunday, Shrove Monday, and Shrove Tuesday, preceding Ash Wednesday.

[Middle English schroftide : schrof-, shriving (from schriven, to shrive; see shrive) + tid, time; see tide1 (so called because in medieval times it was customary for Christians to confess and be shriven in the week before Lent).]

Shrovetide

(ˈʃrəʊvˌtaɪd)
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) the Sunday, Monday, and Tuesday before Ash Wednesday, formerly a time when confessions were made in preparation for Lent

Shrove•tide

(ˈʃroʊvˌtaɪd)

n.
the three days before Ash Wednesday.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Shrovetide - immediately preceding Lent
church calendar, ecclesiastical calendar - a calendar of the Christian year indicating the dates of fasts and festivals
season - a recurrent time marked by major holidays; "it was the Christmas season"
Mardi Gras, pancake day, Shrove Tuesday - the last day before Lent
Translations
أيام المَرافِع
tři dny před Popeleční středou
fastelavn
farsang utolsó három napja
fašiangy
Büyük Perhiz'den üç gün önce

Shrovetide

[ˈʃrəʊvtaɪd] Ncarnestolendas fpl

Shrovetide

nFastnacht f (die drei Tage vor Aschermittwoch)

shrove

(ʃrouv) : Shrove ˈSunday noun
the first day of Shrovetide.
Shrove ˈTuesday noun
the last day of Shrovetide, when people traditionally eat pancakes.
ˈShrovetide noun
the three days before Ash Wednesday.
References in classic literature ?
This ball was an exceptional affair, given some time before Shrovetide, in honor of the anniversary of the birth of a famous draftsman; and it was expected to be much gayer, noisier, more Bohemian than the ordinary masked ball.
The ill-luck of the unfortunate Sancho so ordered it that among the company in the inn there were four woolcarders from Segovia, three needle-makers from the Colt of Cordova, and two lodgers from the Fair of Seville, lively fellows, tender-hearted, fond of a joke, and playful, who, almost as if instigated and moved by a common impulse, made up to Sancho and dismounted him from his ass, while one of them went in for the blanket of the host's bed; but on flinging him into it they looked up, and seeing that the ceiling was somewhat lower what they required for their work, they decided upon going out into the yard, which was bounded by the sky, and there, putting Sancho in the middle of the blanket, they began to raise him high, making sport with him as they would with a dog at Shrovetide.
And, what is more," said Hordle John, suddenly appearing out of the buttery with the huge board upon which the pastry was rolled, "if either raise sword I shall flatten him like a Shrovetide pancake.
The Sunday Times said Pottermania was dying down but mentioned the famous Shrovetide football match held every year involving up to 70 players.
During our stay the annual Shrovetide Football match took place in Ashbourne.
99) HHHHH WHEN the richest man in Oakham - a vividly imagined, late 15th century Somerset village - is swept away and lost in the river one Shrovetide morning, it falls to bucolic priest John Reve to investigate.
This year, bad weather brought its cold, windy adjustments, and Shrovetide student festivities from the university square of the Agrarian University were transferred to native faculties.
A traditional Shrovetide pig-killing was organised in many localities around the country.
CHAOS, excitement and thousands of people have been flowing through Atherstone as the 819th instalment of the town's Shrovetide ball gets underway.
Utterly enchanting in Visek's account is the following humorous, bizarrely rustic Brueghelinspired The Stofe Between Shrovetide and Lent.
5) As Voigts suggests, the Croxton Play depicts an 'actual doctor', not a boasting buffoon attempting to perform miracles like the 'quack doctors in mummers' plays and Shrovetide plays'.
lt/lzinios/Lietuva/kvietimas-i-uzgavenes-naisiuose-su-antisemitizmo-atspalviu/239351) an invitation for the Mardi Gras, or Shrovetide, festival on Facebook that included an image of a hook-nosed Jew.