Siberian traps


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Related to Siberian traps: Deccan Traps, ichthyosaurs

Siberian traps

A very large region of thick basaltic rock near the Siberian city of Tura and associated with one of the largest volcanic eruptions in the earth's history. The eruption took place approximately 245 million years ago and is thought to be a cause of the mass extinctions at the boundary of the Permian and Triassic Periods.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Siberian Traps eruptions spewed more than 3 million cubic kilometers of molten rock (SN: 1/15/11, p.
Some researchers have suggested that these gases might have been spewed out by the volcanic eruptions that produced the Siberian traps, a vast formation of volcanic rock produced by the most extensive eruptions in Earth's geological record.
Up to 90% of marine species and 70% of land vertebrates were killed by massive volcanic eruptions from the region now called the Siberian Traps, which covers much of northern Asia.
The explosion created the Siberian Traps, huge deposits of igneous rocks in what is now Russia.
Drawing upon an understanding he developed with respect to the East African Rift System and the underlying rifting and extensive petroleum and natural gas deposits associated with the Siberian Traps, Herndon predicts the extensively rifted region beneath the Deccan Traps of India will become the site of important energy-resource discoveries.
It is believed to have been caused by volcanic eruptions in Russia which produced a huge area of lava known as the Siberian traps.
They are hosted in a number of intrusions that were part of a network of feeders to the Siberian Traps (flood basalts).
To determine whether eruptions from the Siberian Traps triggered a massive increase in oceanic carbon dioxide, Burgess and Bowring are using similar dating techniques to establish a timescale for the Permian period's volcanic eruptions that are estimated to have covered over five million cubic kilometers.
Some scientists have blamed these eruptions, known as the Siberian Traps, for climate changes that contributed to the extinctions.
The cause of such a massive extinction is a matter of scientific debate, centring on several potential causes, including an asteroid collision, similar to what likely killed off the dinosaurs 186 million years later; a gradual, global loss of oxygen in the oceans; and a cascade of environmental events triggered by massive volcanic eruptions in a region known today as the Siberian Traps.
Although the cause of this event is a mystery, it has been speculated that the eruption of a large swath of volcanic rock in Russia called the Siberian Traps was a trigger for the extinction.
Basu of the University of Rochester in New York used high-precision techniques to pin down the age of vast deposits of volcanic basalts, known as the Siberian Traps, the cover 340,000 square kilometers in the northern Soviet Union.