silver age

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silver age

n.
A period of history secondary in achievement to that of a golden age.

silver age

n
1. (Classical Myth & Legend) (in Greek and Roman mythology) the second of the world's major epochs, inferior to the preceding golden age and characterized by opulence and irreligion
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the postclassical period of Latin literature, occupying the early part of the Roman imperial era, characterized by an overindulgence in elegance for its own sake and empty scholarly rhetoric

sil′ver age′


n.
1. a period of diminished achievement following a golden age.
2. (sometimes cap.) (in Greek and Roman myth) a period following the golden age, characterized by an increase in impiety and human weakness.
[1555–65]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.silver age - (classical mythology) the second age of the world, characterized by opulence and irreligion; by extension, a period secondary in achievement to a golden age
classical mythology - the system of mythology of the Greeks and Romans together; much of Roman mythology (especially the gods) was borrowed from the Greeks
period, period of time, time period - an amount of time; "a time period of 30 years"; "hastened the period of time of his recovery"; "Picasso's blue period"
References in periodicals archive ?
who drew Batman and Superman in the World's Finest Comics (1955-63) in what was a particularly old, cartoony, 1940s pop mariner unusual for the silver-age, early-'60s, more "polished," corporate DC.
This quote illustrates how books such as Esther which are definitely "late," that is, post-exilic, are considered to exhibit linguistic "peculiarities"; how the language of these silver-age books is "degraded" (note the pejorative term indicating degeneration from a higher state); how books even later than these "late" books exhibit an even more "degraded" form of Hebrew; how the late books are considered to be under Aramaic influence; and how the terminus of (utter?
She's rescued by The Middleman (Keeslar), a superhero so staid he makes the Silver-Age Superman look like "Iron Man's" party-hearty alter-ego Tony Stark, who's impressed at how she responded to the peril with a cool, almost blas(hrt), temperament ("Whatever, I'm a temp," she replies) and offers her a job as his assistant.