simile

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Related to Similes: smiles, Idioms

sim·i·le

 (sĭm′ə-lē)
n.
A figure of speech in which two essentially unlike things are compared, often in a phrase introduced by like or as, as in "How like the winter hath my absence been" or "So are you to my thoughts as food to life" (Shakespeare).

[Middle English, from Latin, likeness, comparison, from neuter of similis, like; see similar.]

simile

(ˈsɪmɪlɪ)
n
(Linguistics) a figure of speech that expresses the resemblance of one thing to another of a different category, usually introduced by as or like. Compare metaphor
[C14: from Latin simile something similar, from similis like]

sim•i•le

(ˈsɪm ə li)

n.
a figure of speech in which two distinct things are compared by using “like” or “as,” as in “She is like a rose.” Compare metaphor.
[1350–1400; < Latin: image, likeness, comparison, n. use of neuter of similis similar]

simile

1. A comparison of one person or thing with another by saying that the first is like the second, as in “She sang like an angel.”
2. Likening one thing to another.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.simile - a figure of speech that expresses a resemblance between things of different kinds (usually formed with `like' or `as')
figure of speech, trope, image, figure - language used in a figurative or nonliteral sense
Translations
تَشْبيه
přirovnání
lignelsesammenligning
hasonlat
líkingsamlíking
salīdzinājums
prirovnanie
liknelse
benzetmeteşbih

simile

[ˈsɪmɪlɪ] Nsímil m

simile

[ˈsɪmɪli] ncomparaison f

simile

nGleichnis nt; his use of similesein Gebrauch mvon Gleichnissen

simile

[ˈsɪmɪlɪ] nsimilitudine f, paragone m

simile

(ˈsiməli) noun
a form of expression using `like' or `as', in which one thing is compared to another which it only resembles in one or a small number of ways. `Her hair was like silk' is a simile.
References in classic literature ?
For I know that all pretty young gentlemen like to have pretty similes made about them--as well they may--but I shall not return the compliment.
SOCRATES: I can tell why you made a simile about me.
But shows, and species virtutibus similes, serve best with them.
The involuntariness of the figures and similes is the most remarkable thing; one loses all perception of what constitutes the figure and what constitutes the simile; everything seems to present itself as the readiest, the correctest and the simplest means of expression.
His similes were humorous, but there was no humor in their meaning.
In his gambling simile, his conclusion was that Luck had dealt him the most remarkable card in the deck, and that for years he had overlooked it.
Both Imagination and Fancy naturally express themselves, often and effectively, through the use of metaphors, similes, and suggestive condensed language.
In poetry, they must be allowed to excel all other mortals; wherein the justness of their similes, and the minuteness as well as exactness of their descriptions, are indeed inimitable.
Mrs Deborah is introduced into the parish with a simile.
the tree at whose foot I lay had opened its rocky side, and in the cleft, like a long lily-bud sliding from its green sheath, stood a dryad, and my speech failed and my breath went as I looked upon her beauty, for which mortality has no simile.
Weathercock can without the wind," suggested Jo, as he paused for a simile.
He had never before seen a woman's lips and teeth which forced upon his mind with such persistent iteration the old Elizabethan simile of roses filled with snow.