simony

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Related to Simonists: barrators

si·mo·ny

 (sī′mə-nē, sĭm′ə-)
n.
The buying or selling of ecclesiastical offices or of indulgences or other spiritual things.

[Middle English simonie, from Old French, from Late Latin simōnia, after Simon Magus, a sorcerer who tried to buy spiritual powers from the Apostle Peter (Acts 8:9-24).]

si′mo·nist n.

simony

(ˈsaɪmənɪ)
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) Christianity the practice, now usually regarded as a sin, of buying or selling spiritual or Church benefits such as pardons, relics, etc, or preferments
[C13: from Old French simonie, from Late Latin sīmōnia, from the name of Simon Magus]
ˈsimonist n

si•mo•ny

(ˈsaɪ mə ni, ˈsɪm ə-)

n.
1. the making of profit out of sacred things.
2. the buying or selling of ecclesiastical preferments, benefices, etc.
[1175–1225; Middle English < Late Latin simōnia; after Simon Magus, who tried to purchase apostolic powers; see Simon (definition 4), -y3]
si′mon•ist, n.

simonism, simony

the practice or defense of the selling of church relies, preferments, etc. — simoniac, simonist, n.
See also: Catholicism
the sin or offense of selling or granting for personal advantage church appointments, benefices, preferments, etc. — simoniac, simonist, n.
See also: Church
the sin or offense of selling or granting for personal advantage church appointments, benefices, preferments, etc. — simonist, n.
See also: Sin
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.simony - traffic in ecclesiastical offices or prefermentssimony - traffic in ecclesiastical offices or preferments
traffic - buying and selling; especially illicit trade
Translations

simony

[ˈsaɪmənɪ] Nsimonía f

simony

n (old Eccl) → Simonie f
References in periodicals archive ?
He predicted that Clement would join his predecessor Boniface VIII in the fiery stony prison of the Simonists in Hell.
The nature of such gifts as freely given is stressed in a passage to be discussed more fully below, contrasting the generosity of Christ with the greed of simonists who profit materially from brokering that which is supposed to be freely available to all (751-58).
7) In other words, by challenging the efficacy of Mezzabarba's sacraments and claiming that simonists could not dedicate churches, celebrate the mass, ordain priests, or consecrate the chrism, the Vallombrosans were not only undermining the attempts of true reformers to create a purified Church set apart by function, but were also blurring the fine line between institutional and personal merit that had been at the core of his debate with Humbert of Silva-Candida during the 1040s.