motion sickness

(redirected from Simulator sickness)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

motion sickness

n.
Nausea and dizziness induced by motion, as in travel by aircraft, car, or ship.

motion sickness

n
(Pathology) the state or condition of being dizzy or nauseous from riding in a moving vehicle

mo′tion sick`ness


n.
nausea and dizziness resulting from the effect of motion on the semicircular canals of the ear, as during car travel.
[1940–45]

motion sickness

Physical discomfort brought about by prolonged movements of the organs of balance within the ear. The symptoms may include headaches, nausea, and vomiting.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.motion sickness - the state of being dizzy or nauseated because of the motions that occur while traveling in or on a moving vehiclemotion sickness - the state of being dizzy or nauseated because of the motions that occur while traveling in or on a moving vehicle
ailment, complaint, ill - an often persistent bodily disorder or disease; a cause for complaining
air sickness, airsickness - motion sickness experienced while traveling by air (especially during turbulence)
car sickness - motion sickness experienced while traveling in a car
mal de mer, naupathia, seasickness - motion sickness experienced while traveling on water
nausea, sickness - the state that precedes vomiting
Translations
matkapahoinvointi
乗り物酔い
åksjuka

motion sickness

nmal m d'auto (or d'aria or di mare)
References in periodicals archive ?
To allow people to move through the environment we will investigate paradigms for virtual walking, And in particular whether the multisensory principles involved in body ownership illusions can be used to lessen simulator sickness.
which made use of the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire (SSQ), which took a substantially longer time to fill.
Another concern is that HMD may have side effects such as simulator sickness, which is estimated to affect 20% of the healthy population (Nichols & Patel, 2002), or visual fatigue.
Simulator sickness or the nausea that many 3D VR users experience has been dealt with quite cleverly within the Tesseract.
The Simulator Sickness Questionnaire (SSQ) (Kennedy, Lane, Berbaum, & Lilienthal, 1993) was administered to screen for simulator sickness symptoms before and after the participants completed three acclimation scenarios (curvy roads, stopping, and lane control) and after the main drive.
Walking" with a joystick feels fine in a console game; in VR, it can induce simulator sickness.
Theory and application are covered, as are areas such as traditional training, augmented reality, virtual reality, surface ships, submarines, naval and commercial aviation, space, and issues such as fidelity, interfaces and control devices, transfer of training, simulator sickness, and effects of motion.
The phenomenon of simulator sickness (SS) is similar to motion sickness (Stanney & Salvendy, 1998).
The aftereffects from exposures to virtual environments have often been evaluated using the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire (SSQ) [1], which was originally devised to evaluate computer-based simulator systems.
Simulator sickness occurs because the eyes are accustomed to real-world speed; virtual reality's slower graphics negatively affect about 8 to 10 percent of all users.
This produces a compelling, immersive and realistic environment which allows for obstacle tracking and avoidance, a view of malfunctions overhead, as well as the field of view and display rate to avoid common simulator sickness.

Full browser ?