sin tax

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sin tax

n. Informal
A tax on certain items, such as cigarettes and alcohol, that are regarded as neither necessities nor luxuries.

sin tax

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) informal a tax levied on something that is considered morally or medically harmful, such as alcohol or tobacco

sin′ tax`


n.
a tax levied on items, as cigarettes or liquor, considered neither luxuries nor necessities.
[1960–65]
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References in periodicals archive ?
There is a large economic literature showing the negative consequences of introducing sin taxes and banning advertising.
States and local governments frequently relied on short-term revenue and expenditure strategies--including so called sin taxes (e.
We need more income, more sinners and more sin taxes.
Voters are more sympathetic to sin taxes if they are told that the revenue will go towards tackling sin, and advocates are keen for the money to go towards "prevention" and "education.
The reasoning behind the proposal by councilors Bill Linehan and Frank Baker is familiar: Use so-called sin taxes to pay for the effects of the items being taxed.
Half are satisfied with taxes on alcohol and tobacco - the so-called sin taxes, while 33 percent were dissatisfied.
Because the "market failure" justification alone cannot explain the resurgence of sin taxes, what remains is a strong revenue-raising objective, coupled with a reinvigoration of paternalism in policymaking circles, which provides political cover for expanding the definition of sin.
The study, on "the sin taxes that make the poor poorer", said: "The most effective way for the state to lift people out of poverty is to stop taking their money.
Sin taxes have the potential to generate substantial revenue.
8% on a monthly basis due to the increase in sin taxes which came into effect on 23 February.
I propose this new tax because all the other sin taxes currently in place are imposed on the poor and working class.
And it has promoted alternative ways of financing and paying for government, such as tax-increment financing: public-private partnerships for building schools, public facilities and infrastructure; leasing public assets such as roads, tunnels, bridges, land, buildings, utilities and even lotteries; and supporting greater use of user fees, gambling and sin taxes.