singer


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sing·er 1

 (sĭng′ər)
n.
1. Music One who sings, especially a trained or professional vocalist.
2. A poet.
3. A songbird.

sing·er 2

 (sĭn′jər)
n.
One that singes.

singer

(ˈsɪŋə)
n
1. (Music, other) a person who sings, esp one who earns a living by singing
2. (Zoology) a singing bird
3. (Poetry) an obsolete word for poet

Singer

(ˈsɪŋə)
n
1. (Biography) Isaac Bashevis. 1904–91, US writer of Yiddish novels and short stories; born in Poland. His works include Satan in Goray (1935), The Family Moscat (1950), the autobiographical In my Father's Court (1966), and The King of the Fields (1989): Nobel prize for literature 1978
2. (Biography) Isaac Merrit. 1811–75, US inventor, who originated and developed an improved chain-stitch sewing machine (1852)

sing•er1

(ˈsɪŋ ər)

n.
1. a person who sings, esp. a trained or professional vocalist.
2. a poet.
3. a singing bird.
[1300–50]

sing•er2

(ˈsɪn dʒər)

n.
a person or thing that singes.
[1870–75]

Sing•er

(ˈsɪŋ ər)

n.
1. Isaac Bashevis, 1904–91, U.S. writer in Yiddish, born in Poland: Nobel prize 1978.
2. Isaac Merrit, 1811–75, U.S. inventor.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.singer - a person who singssinger - a person who sings      
alto - a singer whose voice lies in the alto clef
baritone, barytone - a male singer
basso, bass - an adult male singer with the lowest voice
canary - a female singer
caroler, caroller - a singer of carols
castrato - a male singer who was castrated before puberty and retains a soprano or alto voice
chorister - a singer in a choir
contralto - a woman singer having a contralto voice
balladeer, crooner - a singer of popular ballads
folk singer, jongleur, minstrel, poet-singer, troubadour - a singer of folk songs
hummer - a singer who produces a tune without opening the lips or forming words
lieder singer - a singer of lieder
madrigalist - a singer of madrigals
instrumentalist, musician, player - someone who plays a musical instrument (as a profession)
opera star, operatic star - singer of lead role in an opera
rapper - someone who performs rap music
rock star - a famous singer of rock music
songster - a person who sings
soprano - a female singer
tenor - an adult male with a tenor voice
thrush - a woman who sings popular songs
torch singer - a singer (usually a woman) who specializes in singing torch songs
voice - (metonymy) a singer; "he wanted to hear trained voices sing it"
warbler - a singer; usually a singer who adds embellishments to the song
yodeller - a singer who changes register rapidly (popular is Swiss folk songs)
2.Singer - United States inventor of an improved chain-stitch sewing machine (1811-1875)
3.Singer - United States writer (born in Poland) of Yiddish stories and novels (1904-1991)

singer

noun vocalist, crooner, minstrel, soloist, cantor, troubadour, chorister, chanteuse (fem.), balladeer, songster or songstress My mother was a singer in a dance band.

singer

noun
A person who sings:
Translations
مُغَنٍمُغَنٍّ
zpěvák-čka
sanger
laulaja
गायकगायिका
pjevačpjevačica
énekesénekesnő
söngvari
歌手
가수
cantor
pevec
sångaresångerska
นักร้อง
ca sĩ

singer

[ˈsɪŋəʳ] Ncantante mf

singer

[ˈsɪŋər] nchanteur/euse m/fsinger-songwriter [ˌsɪŋərˈsɒŋraɪtər] nchanteur/euse auteur compositeur/trice m/f

singer

nSänger(in) m(f)

singer

[ˈsɪŋəʳ] ncantante m/f

sing

(siŋ) past tense sang (saŋ) : past participle sung (saŋ) verb
to make (musical sounds) with one's voice. He sings very well; She sang a Scottish song; I could hear the birds singing in the trees.
ˈsinger noun
a person who sings, eg as a profession. Are you a good singer?; He's a trained singer.
ˈsinging noun
the art or activity of making musical sounds with one's voice. Do you do much singing nowadays?; (also adjective) a singing lesson/teacher.
sing out
to shout or call out. Sing out when you're ready to go.

singer

مُغَنٍ zpěvák sanger Sänger τραγουδιστής cantante laulaja chanteur pjevač cantante 歌手 가수 zanger sanger śpiewak cantor певец sångare นักร้อง şarkıcı ca sĩ 歌唱者
References in classic literature ?
and it had become a household custom, for the mother was a born singer.
I heard the name Vasakova, Vasakova, repeated several times with lively interest, and presently I asked him whether he were talking about the singer, Maria Vasak.
But, happily, we have fallen in with a hunter, he whom you hear talking to the singer, that is acquainted with the deerpaths and by-ways of the woods, and who promises to lead us to a place where we may rest securely till the morning.
She stopped as crimson with shame and indignation as if the viewless singer had risen before her.
The singer appeared to make up the song to his own pleasure, generally hitting on rhyme, without much attempt at reason; and the party took up the chorus, at intervals,
The singer can easily move us to tears or to laughter, but where is he who can excite in us a pure morning joy?
The poorest paid architect, engineer, general, author, sculptor, painter, lecturer, advocate, legislator, actor, preacher, singer is constructively in heaven when he is at work; and as for the musician with the fiddle-bow in his hand who sits in the midst of a great orchestra with the ebbing and flowing tides of divine sound washing over him -- why, certainly, he is at work, if you wish to call it that, but lord, it's a sarcasm just the same.
I said that over the water we were not quite so generous; that with us, when a singer had lost his voice and a jumper had lost his legs, these parties ceased to draw.
When a Sunday-school superin- tendent makes his customary little speech, a hymn-book in the hand is as necessary as is the inevitable sheet of music in the hand of a singer who stands forward on the platform and sings a solo at a concert -- though why, is a mystery: for neither the hymn-book nor the sheet of music is ever referred to by the sufferer.
Jenny is named for a singer and Fanny for a beautiful dancer, but mother says they're both misfits, for Jenny can't carry a tune and Fanny's kind of stiff- legged.
The exercises of his family devotions were always commenced with singing; and, as he was a very poor singer himself, the duty of raising the hymn generally came upon me.
or we should be sitting in flaming fagots, I suppose,' retorted the singer.