microorganism

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mi·cro·or·gan·ism

 (mī′krō-ôr′gə-nĭz′əm)
n.
An organism or infectious agent of microscopic or submicroscopic size, especially a bacterium or protozoan.

microorganism

(ˌmaɪkrəʊˈɔːɡəˌnɪzəm)
n
(Microbiology) any organism, such as a bacterium, protozoan, or virus, of microscopic size

mi•cro•or•gan•ism

(ˌmaɪ kroʊˈɔr gəˌnɪz əm)

n.
any organism too small to be viewed by the unaided eye, as bacteria or some fungi and algae.
[1875–80]
mi`cro•or•gan′ic
(-ɔrˈgæn ɪk)
adj.

mi·cro·or·gan·ism

(mī′krō-ôr′gə-nĭz′əm)
An organism that can be seen only with the aid of a microscope. Microorganisms include bacteria, protozoans, algae, and fungi. See Note at germ.

microorganism

any one of a large variety of microscopic or ultramicroscopic organisms, as bacteria, viruses, etc.
See also: Organisms
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.microorganism - any organism of microscopic sizemicroorganism - any organism of microscopic size  
organism, being - a living thing that has (or can develop) the ability to act or function independently
animal, animate being, beast, creature, fauna, brute - a living organism characterized by voluntary movement
plant life, flora, plant - (botany) a living organism lacking the power of locomotion
monad - (biology) a single-celled microorganism (especially a flagellate protozoan)
intestinal flora - harmless microorganisms (as Escherichia coli) that inhabit the intestinal tract and are essential for its normal functioning
virus - (virology) ultramicroscopic infectious agent that replicates itself only within cells of living hosts; many are pathogenic; a piece of nucleic acid (DNA or RNA) wrapped in a thin coat of protein
moneran, moneron - organisms that typically reproduce by asexual budding or fission and whose nutritional mode is absorption or photosynthesis or chemosynthesis
bacteria, bacterium - (microbiology) single-celled or noncellular spherical or spiral or rod-shaped organisms lacking chlorophyll that reproduce by fission; important as pathogens and for biochemical properties; taxonomy is difficult; often considered to be plants
microbe, germ, bug - a minute life form (especially a disease-causing bacterium); the term is not in technical use
pathogen - any disease-producing agent (especially a virus or bacterium or other microorganism)
protoctist - any of the unicellular protists
protist, protistan - free-living or colonial organisms with diverse nutritional and reproductive modes
pilus - hairlike structure especially on the surface of a cell or microorganism
virulence, virulency - extreme harmfulness (as the capacity of a microorganism to cause disease); "the virulence of the plague"
transmitter, vector - any agent (person or animal or microorganism) that carries and transmits a disease; "mosquitos are vectors of malaria and yellow fever"; "fleas are vectors of the plague"; "aphids are transmitters of plant diseases"; "when medical scientists talk about vectors they are usually talking about insects"
microflora - microscopic plants; bacteria are often considered to be microflora
bacteremia, bacteriaemia, bacteriemia - transient presence of bacteria (or other microorganisms) in the blood

microorganism

also micro-organism
noun
A minute organism usually producing disease:
Translations
mikroorganismus
mikroorganisme
mikro-organismi
מיקרואורגניזם
mikroorganizam
mikroorganisme
微生物

microorganism

[ˈmaɪkrəʊˈɔːgənɪzəm] Nmicroorganismo m

microorganism

[ˌmaɪkrəʊˈɔːgəˌnɪzm] nmicroorganismo

mi·cro·or·gan·ism

n. microorganismo, organismo que no puede verse a simple vista.

microorganism

n microorganismo, microbio
References in periodicals archive ?
In the case of single-celled organisms, those genes are sometimes passed along to future generations, he said.
Zymergen integrates computational and manufacturing technologies to design, engineer, and optimize microbes single-celled organisms to unlock the vast potential of nature's foundational factory, the cell.
Therefore, the route Earthly lifeforms took from simple, single-celled organisms to successively more complex entities can give hints of how life might play out elsewhere in the cosmos.
Microbial species are all forms of life too small to be seen with the naked eye, including all single-celled organisms, such as bacteria and archaea, as well as certain fungi.
This is an authoritative glossary of over 900 terms in the field of invertebrate zoology, which is the study of all animals without backbones, including many single-celled organisms.
The book draws to a conclusion with single-celled organisms and the advent of any controlled movement at all, gesturing backward in narrative and forward in time toward the massive consequences of that evolutionary step.
Prehoda's team's first problem was imagining how single-celled organisms could arrange themselves alongside their counterparts and establish a colony that could begin to cooperate and become complex, many-celled life forms.
It was a hodgepodge of single-celled organisms, differing in forms and lifestyles but lumped together largely for convenience.
It focuses on the cute yellow single-celled organisms, called Minions.
Bacteria are single-celled organisms that have protective cell walls.
Cabej argues that as genetic mechanisms are becoming better understood, study of epigenetic ones becomes necessary to study interactions between the two that explain such basic questions as how single-celled organisms coordinate activities, a fish changes sex, or a plant builds environmentally variable body forms.
Organism Description Cyanobacteria Photosynthetic single-celled organisms without nuclei and with a thin layer of peptidoglycan in their cell walls.

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