Sir Roger de Coverley


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Sir Roger de Coverley

n
(Dancing) an English country dance performed to a traditional tune by two rows of dancers facing each other
[C18: alteration of Roger of Coverley influenced by Sir Roger de Coverley, a fictitious character appearing in the Spectator essays by Addison and Steele]
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References in classic literature ?
He patted children on the head like Sir Roger de Coverley going to church, he spoke to people in the background by their Christian names, he condescended to all present, and seemed for their consolation to walk encircled by the legend in golden characters, 'Be comforted, my people
He takes off his long-flapped coat, and stands up in a long- flapped waistcoat, which Sir Roger de Coverley might have worn when it was new, picks out a stick, and is ready for Master Joe, who loses no time, but begins his old game, whack, whack, whack, trying to break down the old man's guard by sheer strength.
For example, the Sir Roger de Coverley English country dance is better known to us as the Virginia reel.
The disc opens and closes with two world premiere recordings, of the rousing if uncharacteristically Elgarian Coronation March of 1911 (written for a competition) and the full orchestral arrangement of the traditional Christmas dance, Sir Roger de Coverley, more familiar in its versions for string orchestra and string quartet.
themselves (for instance Sir Roger de Coverley or Parson Adams) the
In one of Addison's famous essays, Sir Roger de Coverley made the profound statement that 'it happens very well that Christmas should fall out in the middle of winter'.