siren

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Si·ren

 (sī′rən)
n.
1. Greek Mythology One of a group of sea nymphs who by their sweet singing lured mariners to destruction on the rocks surrounding their island.
2. siren A woman regarded as irresistibly alluring.

[Middle English serein, from Old French sereine; see siren.]

si·ren

 (sī′rən)
n.
1.
a. A device in which compressed air or steam is driven against a rotating perforated disk to create a loud, often wailing sound as a signal or warning.
b. An electronic device producing a similar sound as a signal or warning: a police car siren.
2. Any of several slender aquatic salamanders of the family Sirenidae of eastern North America, having external gills, small forelimbs, and no hind limbs.

[French sirène, from Old French sereine, Siren, from Late Latin Sīrēna, from Latin Sīrēn, from Greek Seirēn.]

siren

(ˈsaɪərən)
n
1. (General Engineering) a device for emitting a loud wailing sound, esp as a warning or signal, typically consisting of a rotating perforated metal drum through which air or steam is passed under pressure
2. (Classical Myth & Legend) (sometimes capital) Greek myth one of several sea nymphs whose seductive singing was believed to lure sailors to destruction on the rocks the nymphs inhabited
3.
a. a woman considered to be dangerously alluring or seductive
b. (as modifier): her siren charms.
4. (Animals) any aquatic eel-like salamander of the North American family Sirenidae, having external gills, no hind limbs, and reduced forelimbs
[C14: from Old French sereine, from Latin sīrēn, from Greek seirēn]

si•ren

(ˈsaɪ rən)

n.
1. (sometimes cap.) any of several supernatural beings in Greek legend who are part woman and part bird and who lure mariners to destruction with seductive singing.
2. a seductively beautiful or charming woman, esp. one who beguiles men.
3. an acoustical device that produces sound by means of a perforated, rotating disk that interrupts a jet of air or steam.
4. an implement of this kind used as a whistle, fog signal, or warning device.
5. any aquatic, eellike salamander of the family Sirenidae, having permanent external gills and no hind limbs.
adj.
6. seductive or tempting, esp. dangerously or harmfully.
[1300–50; Middle English sereyn < Old French sereine < Late Latin Sīrēna, Latin Sīrēn < Greek Seirḗn]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.siren - a sea nymph (part woman and part bird) supposed to lure sailors to destruction on the rocks where the nymphs livedSiren - a sea nymph (part woman and part bird) supposed to lure sailors to destruction on the rocks where the nymphs lived; "Odysseus ordered his crew to plug their ears so they would not hear the Siren's fatal song"
sea nymph - (Greek mythology) a water nymph who was the daughter of Oceanus or Nereus
2.siren - a woman who is considered to be dangerously seductivesiren - a woman who is considered to be dangerously seductive
adult female, woman - an adult female person (as opposed to a man); "the woman kept house while the man hunted"
3.siren - a warning signal that is a loud wailing sound
alarum, warning signal, alarm, alert - an automatic signal (usually a sound) warning of danger
4.siren - an acoustic device producing a loud often wailing sound as a signal or warning
acoustic device - a device for amplifying or transmitting sound
alarm system, warning device, alarm - a device that signals the occurrence of some undesirable event
5.siren - eellike aquatic North American salamander with small forelimbs and no hind limbs; have permanent external gills
salamander - any of various typically terrestrial amphibians that resemble lizards and that return to water only to breed
genus Siren - a genus of Sirenidae

siren

noun
1. alert, warning, signal, alarm It sounds like an air raid siren.
2. seductress, vamp (informal), femme fatale (French), witch, charmer, temptress, Lorelei, Circe She's a voluptuous siren with a husky voice.

siren

noun
A usually unscrupulous woman who seduces or exploits men:
Informal: vamp, witch.
adjective
Translations
siréna
sirene
sireeniseireeni
sirenasiren
sziréna
sírena
サイレン
경적
sirēna
sirena
sirena
siren
เสียงสัญญาณเตือนภัย
còi báo động

siren

[ˈsaɪərən] N (all senses) → sirena f

siren

[ˈsaɪərən] n
(= device) → sirène f
a police siren → une sirène de police
an air-raid siren → une sirène d'alerte aérienne
(MYTHOLOGY)sirène fsiren call siren song nchant m des sirènes

siren

n (all senses) → Sirene f

siren

[ˈsaɪərn] n (all senses) → sirena

siren

(ˈsaiərən) noun
a kind of instrument that gives out a loud hooting noise as a (warning) signal. a factory siren.

siren

صَفَّارَةُ الْإِنْذَار siréna sirene Sirene σειρήνα sirena sireeni sirène sirena sirena サイレン 경적 sirene sirene syrena sirene сирена siren เสียงสัญญาณเตือนภัย siren còi báo động 汽笛
References in classic literature ?
Had you heard it from aboard the Argo, you would have declared it to be the sirens singing, and it would have been found necessary to lash you to the mast.
THE SIRENS, SCYLLA AND CHARYBDIS, THE CATTLE OF THE SUN.
Yet it was not so sweet as the song of the Sirens, those bird-like damsels who wanted to tempt us on the rocks, so that our vessel might be wrecked, and our bones left whitening along the shore.
It was for the Mediterranean sailors that fair-haired sirens sang among the black rocks seething in white foam and mysterious voices spoke in the darkness above the moving wave - voices menacing, seductive, or prophetic, like that voice heard at the beginning of the Christian era by the master of an African vessel in the Gulf of Syrta, whose calm nights are full of strange murmurs and flitting shadows.
These illustrious ladies appeared so lovely on the sign, -- they presented to the astonished eyes such an assemblage of lilies and roses, the enchanting result of the change of style in Pittrino -- they assumed the poses of sirens so Anacreontically -- that the principal echevin, when admitted to view this capital piece in the salle of Cropole, at once declared that these ladies were too handsome, of too animated a beauty, to figure as a sign in the eyes of passers-by.
The wind rushed into the room, together with the sound of distant wheels, footsteps hurrying along the pavement, and the cries of sirens hooting down the river.
Each of the ladies, being after the fashion of their sex, highly trained in promoting men's talk without listening to it, could think--about the education of children, about the use of fog sirens in an opera--without betraying herself.
Well, if you don't mean to be won by the sirens, you are right to take precautions in time.
For the most part I escaped wonderfully from these dangers, either by proceeding at once boldly and without deliberation to the goal, as is recommended to those who run the gauntlet, or by keeping my thoughts on high things, like Orpheus, who, "loudly singing the praises of the gods to his lyre, drowned the voices of the Sirens, and kept out of danger.
So the sailors of Ulysses voyaged past the Sirens, having first stopped one another's ears with wool.
His nurse told him that those good-natured-looking women were in the constant habit of enticing children into the barges, and taking them up to London and selling them, which Tom wouldn't believe, and which made him resolve as soon as possible to accept the oft-proffered invitation of these sirens to "young master" to come in and have a ride.
His face was shining, his eyes flashing with excitement as he translated into articulate language the speech of the horns and sirens.