Skara Brae


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Skara Brae

(ˈskærə)
n
1. (Archaeology) a Neolithic village in NE Scotland, in the Orkney Islands: one of Europe's most perfectly preserved Stone Age villages, buried by a sand dune until uncovered by a storm in 1850
2. (Placename) a Neolithic village in NE Scotland, in the Orkney Islands: one of Europe's most perfectly preserved Stone Age villages, buried by a sand dune until uncovered by a storm in 1850
References in periodicals archive ?
They included the Standing Stones of Stenness, a neolithic monument believed to be the oldest henge in the British Isles, the Ring of Brodgar and Skara Brae, the most complete remaining neolithic settlement in Europe.
Next were the Standing Stones of Stenness, a neolithic monument believed to be the oldest henge in the British Isles, and the Ring of Brodgar - both free Unesco world heritage sites - before a visit to Skara Brae.
Also featured are the Battersea shield, Star Carr headdress, Skara Brae village (Orkney Islands), Grime's Graves flint mines, Avebury stone circles, the Drumbest horns (Northern Ireland) and Maiden Castle hill fort.
Initially, the bus will run between Skara Brae and Tormiston Mill 3 times daily.
Howie is the unlikely Protector of the Realm charged with defending Skara Brae with a rusty sword and a dented horn.
Among those highlighted in the report are Stonehenge, Skara Brae on Orkney, New York's Statue of Liberty and St Mark's Square in Venice.
More severe problems threaten the Heart of Neolithic Orkney World Heritage site, where many archaeological sites are on the coast due to the importance of the sea in Stone Age life, and at least half are under threat from coastal erosion Five-thousand-year-old Skara Brae, the best-preserved Stone Age dwelling complex in Western Europe, with houses and stone furniture, is the most highprofile site at risk of eventual loss to coastal erosion, the study said.
Visiting earth's dryest and wettest places, we end up at Skara Brae, a stone's throw away from the Highlands.
As information sources for primary aged children go, Skara Brae in the 'Prehistoric Britain' series by Raintree Press ticks all the new curriculum boxes.
Author Julian Spalding rejects the traditional view that Skara Brae in the Orkney Islands is a 5000-year-old burial site.
Among the wonderful sights on Orkney are the Standing Stones of Stenness, the Neolithic settlement of Skara Brae and my favourite, the Italian Chapel.
But an organised tour is the only realistic way of getting to places such as the fascinating Neolithic settlement of Skara Brae and the exquisite stone circles, the historic Scapa Flow and the majestic landscapes.