Skase


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Skase

(ˈskeɪs)
n
do a Skase informal Austral to skip the country while owing a large amount of money
[C20: after the Australian businessman Christopher Skase (1948–2001), who fled Australia after the collapse of his business empire, owing millions of dollars]
References in periodicals archive ?
Skase, meanwhile, outbid none other than Rupert Murdoch in a manic campaign to acquire Kerkorian's holdings, only to confess that he never had the money to begin with (Murdoch stalked off in a rage).
All conference participants should be aware that neither Pavol Jozef Safarik University in Kosice, nor SKASE, nor ESSE have or will accept any liability whatsoever for any damage or injury to visitors or their property, or to the university or its property, or to any other party, however such damage or injury may be caused.
Translation as Intercultural Transfer: The Case of Law, SKASE Journal of Translation and Interpretation 3(1) [interactive], [accessed 06-04-2011].
Urban white-collar) -- Christopher Skase comes to mind.
It was faintly like making Christopher Skase our Ambassador to Spain.
Australia's most wanted fugitive, failed business tycoon Christopher Skase, has died in self-imposed exile on Majorca.
Professor Richard Skase from Kent University said our British neighbours have embraced the new celibacy with glee.
Confessing his shame yesterday Fletcher, 33, who played Sun Hill hard- man Rob Skase, told the Sunday People: "We were out of our minds.
Fletcher, who played tough-guy Rod Skase, left the show earlier this year, claiming it was bad for his health.
It was bought by a company called Quintex and is owned by Christoper Skase, who is currently in hiding in Majorca over money problems with the Australian government.
On Thursday the Sun Hill boys went even further with a 90-minute French special, as DCI Meadows (Simon Rouse) and DC Rod Skase (Iain Fletcher) tried to conduct a murder investigation in Normandy with barely a "oui" or "non" in their constabulary vocabulary.
The most noticeable result was the rise and fall of paper financial empires of the `entrepreneurs', such as Bond and Skase in Australia and Judge in New Zealand.