Slav

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Slav

 (släv)
n.
A member of one of the Slavic-speaking peoples of eastern Europe.

[Middle English Sclave, from Medieval Latin Sclāvus, from Late Greek Sklabos, alteration of Old Slavic Slověninŭ.]

Slav

(slɑːv)
n
(Peoples) a member of any of the peoples of E Europe or NW Asia who speak a Slavonic language
[C14: from Medieval Latin Sclāvus a captive Slav; see slave]

Slav

(slɑv, slæv)

n.
a member of a Slavic-speaking people.
[1350–1400; Middle English Sclave < Medieval Latin Sclāvus, Slāvus, akin to Late Greek Sklábos < a Slavic ethnonym (compare Slovak, Slovene)]

Slav

or Slav.,

Slavic.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Slav - any member of the people of eastern Europe or Asian Russia who speak a Slavonic languageSlav - any member of the people of eastern Europe or Asian Russia who speak a Slavonic language
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
Slavic people, Slavic race - a race of people speaking a Slavonic language
Serb, Serbian - a member of a Slavic people who settled in Serbia and neighboring areas in the 6th and 7th centuries
Croat, Croatian - a member of the Slavic people living in Croatia
Sorbian - a speaker of Sorbian
Cossack - a member of a Slavic people living in southern European Russia and Ukraine and adjacent parts of Asia and noted for their horsemanship and military skill; they formed an elite cavalry corps in czarist Russia
Adj.1.Slav - speaking a Slavic language; "the Slav population of Georgia"
Translations
Slovan
slaavi
SlavenSlavenka
slav
слов'янинслов'янка

Slav

[slɑːv]
A. ADJeslavo
B. Neslavo/a m/f

Slav

[ˈslɑːv]
adjslave
nSlave mf

Slav

adjslawisch
nSlawe m, → Slawin f

Slav

[slɑːv] adj & nslavo/a
References in periodicals archive ?
The forum is a non-governmental organisation featuring prominent cultural, scientific and educational figures with the goal of preserving and promoting cultural and historical heritage of the Slavic peoples.
Historians estimate the total number of deaths to be 11 million, with the victims encompassing gay people, priests, gypsies, people with mental or physical disabilities, communists, trade unionists, JehovahAcs Witnesses, anarchists, Poles and other Slavic peoples, black people and resistance fighters.
So, it could be said that the South Slavic peoples, as well as the peoples of Bosnia, have not yet developed and tested a political culture that surpasses the "tribal image of the world" and prefers free man as the greatest value of the social life of people.
Hicks provided a link to a Huffington Post story which noted that, in addition to the six million Jews killed by the Nazis, five million others were also slaughtered during World War II, including "priests, gypsies, people with mental or physical disabilities, communists, trade unionists, Jehovah's Witnesses, anarchists, Poles and other Slavic peoples, and resistance fighters.
The Slavic peoples, in their turn, surrounded our territory like a belt.
The Forum of Slavic Cultures, thanks to the excellent regional cooperation, is recognized worldwide today as a referential global platform for intercultural dialogue and for preserving the cultural traditions of the Slavic peoples as lasting and universal values on a global scale.
Pope John VIII (872-882) named the new church Sancta Ecclesia Marabensis in a letter he sent to the Moravian ruler Svatopluk, she says, and charged it with the pastoral care of the Slavic peoples living beyond the eastern border of the Carolingian realm.
This may reflect the expansion of Slavic peoples into Europe more than 1,000 years ago.
In an extremely detailed survey of the archaeological, numismatic, and historical evidence for Slavic peoples in Greece, editor Florin Curta concludes that there was not a Slavic conquest of Greece.