Slavism


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Slav·ism

 (slä′vĭz′əm) or Slav·i·cism (slä′vĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
1. A linguistic feature of one or more Slavic languages, especially a Slavic idiom or phrasing that appears in a non-Slavic language.
2. An attitude, custom, or other feature that is characteristically Slavic.
3. Esteem for and emulation of Slavic culture and politics.

Slavism

(ˈslɑːvɪzəm)
n
1. (Peoples) anything characteristic of, peculiar to, or associated with the Slavs or the Slavonic languages
2. (Languages) anything characteristic of, peculiar to, or associated with the Slavs or the Slavonic languages

Slav•ism

(ˈslɑ vɪz əm, ˈslæv ɪz-)

also Slavicism



n.
something native to, characteristic of, or associated with the Slavs or Slavic.
[1875–85]
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Is the Slavism, identity, secularism and antifascism, while abandoned in Eastern Europe, confused perhaps by the mixed signals from the austerity-tired Atlantic Europe and uber-performing Central Europe?
For whose sake Eastern Europe has been barred of all important debates such as that of Slavism, identity, social cohesion (eroded by the plunder called "privatization"), secularism and antifascism?
Xhezair Saqiri-Hoxha said that the anti-Albanian government is trying to impose the Slavism to future Albanian generations.
Erol Rizaov comments for Utrinski Vesnik that the revenge of the chained ancient heroes on Skopje's square began after the Government admitted that its search for a more famous past and new ancient identity at the expense of the Slavism measured with money costs more than 200 million euro.
The word Pan Islamism, in its various forms, is apparently of European coinage and was probably adopted in imitation of Pan Slavism that was current in the 1870s.
Later, slavism -characterized for the property of production means and labor- brought accumulation of land ownership and thus, gave way to another kind of organization, based on manor, political and military counteroffersfor land and labor.
He made a distinction (1899) between Russification and Slavification, the former representing an inevitable national and social transformation and as such a positive drift; the latter standing for a merging into Slavism (language, education, religion) and something to be fought against at all costs.
For the sake of quick Atlantic-Central Europe penetrations into the body and soul of East, all important debates such as that of Slavism, identity, secularism and antifascism have been advised to Eastern Europe to abandon.