Slavist


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Related to Slavist: Slavicist

Slav·ist

 (slä′vĭst) or Slav·i·cist (slä′vĭ-sĭst)
n.
A specialist in the study of Slavic culture, literature, or languages.
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References in periodicals archive ?
As early as 1842, the prominent Czech Slavist Frantisek Palacky argued for the probability of such a connection.
The Ambassador of the Federal Republic of Germany, Gudrun Steinacker, and German Slavist and Macedonian language scholar Wolf Oschlies spoke at the promotion of this outstanding piece of scholarly literature.
The Slavist in the digital world: Creating scholarly resources in partnership with librarians at the University of Virginia.
o nn vabadusepaevadel algas valitsusvoimu norgenemisega "seadusliku voimu valjatorjumine" ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) (32) Teine anonuumne autor markis, et jutud Lati Vabariigist on tuhi loba; tegelikult tahavad lati revolutsionaarid koos vene revolutsionaaridega luua "ulevenemaalise sotsiaal-demokraatliku vabariigi" ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) (33) Tuntud slavist ja marurahvusliku Okraino Rossii kaastooline, endine Tartu ulikooli rektor professor Anton Budilovits juhtis tahelepanu sellele, et Eesti ja Lati kongressid taotlevad autonoomiat ning foderatiivseid suhteid Venemaaga, mitte aga iseseisvat riiki voi vabariiki.
The rich history of the Macedonian Radio writes that in 1950 the first lector-translation department was formed, led by the just graduated student from the Faculty of the Macedonian Language Trajko Stamatovski, who had been working as proof reader and translator with the Radio since 1947 and today, the oldest linguist, Macedonianist and Slavist in the Republic of Macedonia, lived to read the Opening Report at the 14th World Congress of Slavists in Ohrid.
Slavist specialists are familiar with the Old Slavonic form of the Latin St.
The Italian Slavist and poet, Angelo Maria Ripellino, hoped to compile a history of Russian letters based on the dance, a repetitious and obsessive theme in Russian literature: the dancing feet in Pushkin, the obscure leaps of Lermontov's characters, Blok's serpentine dances, Bely's mountebanks.
70) This is virtually a re-launch of Solzhenitsyn among members of the Slavist guild, which, lacking immunity from intellectual fashions, has taken its cue from the unscholarly public prints, and he will come into his own only when his literature is given the primacy that he has assigned to it.
The eminent Slavist, Dmytro Chyzhevs'kyi (1894-1977), contended that Skovoroda was a mystic for whom the rationalism of the Enlightenment was "without a soul".
Dorsey's insightful analysis--informed methodologically by rhetoric and literary interpretation and by his extensive historical knowledge of the post-abolition slave trade--is sensitively attuned to the multiple voices that are registered in the testimony: from the conflicting, dominant voices of slavist and abolitionist masculinities, both of which operate to silence the girls' original testimony, to the more distant echoes of the girls' suffering and resistance.
Already a distinguished Slavist in general (author of Shostakovich in Context) and Chekhov scholar in particular (her edition of Chekhov: A Life in Letters is published by Penguin Classics), she has chosen to channel her considerable energies and expertise into creating a new perspective on the man.
IN REASONS FOR LIVING, Dmitry Gennadiyevich (his real name and patronymic) Bakin (a pseudonym) is introduced by Byron Lindsey, an American Slavist, who interviewed him at the writer's residence in 1996.