slime mould

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slime mould

n
(Botany) any of various simple spore-producing organisms typically found as slimy masses on rotting vegetation, where they engulf food particles by amoeboid movements. Formerly regarded as fungi, they are now classified as protoctists of the phyla Myxomycota (true, or cellular slime moulds) or Acrasiomycota (plasmodial slime moulds)
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.slime mould - a naked mass of protoplasm having characteristics of both plants and animalsslime mould - a naked mass of protoplasm having characteristics of both plants and animals; sometimes classified as protoctists
acellular slime mold, myxomycete, plasmodial slime mold, true slime mold - a slime mold of the class Myxomycetes
cellular slime mold - differing from true slime molds in being cellular and nucleate throughout the life cycle
fungus - an organism of the kingdom Fungi lacking chlorophyll and feeding on organic matter; ranging from unicellular or multicellular organisms to spore-bearing syncytia
References in periodicals archive ?
Sentient slime molds with their first crush won't take no for an answer.
In response, this article defends a plural ontology of process, activity, event, and continuant, and shows how a sortalist philosophy of substance that makes Hilary Putnam's distinction of realism from metaphysical realism can treat disputed questions concerning the identity and individuation of colonial siphonophores, slime molds, and plant-colonies.
Burt was interested in a particular kind of selfish gene present in slime molds, called an endonuclease.
In 2010, slime molds provided a surprising insight to Atsushi Tero of Hokkaido University and his team.
Introduction to Mycology in the Tropics" thoroughly covers Basidiomycota, Ascomycota, lichens, further groups of Fungi, Straminipila (Heterokonta), and slime molds.
The kngdom of fungi also includes yeasts, slime molds, rusts and several other types of related organisms.
What started out as simple cells ultimately transformed into slime molds, frogs, elephants, humans and the rest of our planet's living kingdoms.
Beginning with population bottlenecks as an easily comprehensible example of where chance plays a major role, the book extends this concept to organisms with small numbers of cells and particularly focuses on Bonner's specialty, slime molds.
While researching the genetics of slime molds and yeast, for example, Dr.
True, slime molds are masses of single-cell organisms without a brain or eyes, but they demonstrate amazing abilities to engage in organized behaviors, carry out coordinated movements and especially, to find their way through mazes and over obstacles to locate food sources.
The various steps needed to go from icy organics to slime molds are not clear, but the new findings help explain how the process works.