snail

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Related to Snails: Garden snails

snail

 (snāl)
n.
1. Any of numerous aquatic or terrestrial gastropod mollusks that typically have a spirally coiled shell, retractile foot, and distinct head.
2. A slow-moving, lazy, or sluggish person.

[Middle English, from Old English snægl.]

snail

(sneɪl)
n
1. (Animals) any of numerous terrestrial or freshwater gastropod molluscs with a spirally coiled shell, esp any of the family Helicidae, such as Helix aspersa (garden snail)
2. (Animals) any other gastropod with a spirally coiled shell, such as a whelk
3. a slow-moving or lazy person or animal
[Old English snægl; related to Old Norse snigill, Old High German snecko]
ˈsnail-ˌlike adj

snail

(sneɪl)

n.
1. any slow-moving gastropod mollusk, having a spirally coiled shell and a ventral muscular foot.
2. a slow or lazy person.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English snegel, c. Old Saxon, Old High German snegel, Old Norse snigill]

Snail

 Military, a D-shaped formation, 1579.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.snail - freshwater or marine or terrestrial gastropod mollusk usually having an external enclosing spiral shellsnail - freshwater or marine or terrestrial gastropod mollusk usually having an external enclosing spiral shell
gastropod, univalve - a class of mollusks typically having a one-piece coiled shell and flattened muscular foot with a head bearing stalked eyes
scorpion shell - any of numerous tropical marine snails that as adults have the outer lip of the aperture produced into a series of long curved spines
edible snail, Helix pomatia - one of the chief edible snails
garden snail - any of several inedible snails of the genus Helix; often destructive pests
2.snail - edible terrestrial snail usually served in the shell with a sauce of melted butter and garlicsnail - edible terrestrial snail usually served in the shell with a sauce of melted butter and garlic
edible snail, Helix pomatia - one of the chief edible snails
meat - the flesh of animals (including fishes and birds and snails) used as food
Verb1.snail - gather snails; "We went snailing in the summer"
whelk - gather whelk
gather, pull together, collect, garner - assemble or get together; "gather some stones"; "pull your thoughts together"

snail

Snails, slugs and other gastropods

abalone or ear shell, conch, cowrie or cowry, limpet, murex, nudibranch or sea slug, ormer or sea-ear, periwinkle or winkle, ramshorn snail, Roman snail, sea hare, slug, snail, top-shell, triton, wentletrap, whelk
Translations
حَلَزونحَلَزُون
охлюв
caragol
hlemýžďšnek
snegl
heliko
tigu
etanakuorellinen etana
स्थलीय घोंघा
puž
csigacsiga2
bekicotkeongsiput
snigill
カタツムリ
달팽이
cochlea
sraigėvėžlio žingsniu
gliemezis
melc
slimák
polž
пуж
snäckasnigel
หอยทาก
salyangozsümüklüböcek
con ốc sênốc

snail

[sneɪl]
A. Ncaracol m
at a snail's pacea paso de tortuga
B. CPD snail mail N (hum) → correo m normal
snail shell Nconcha f de caracol

snail

[ˈsneɪl] nescargot m
a snail's pace → une extrême lenteur
at a snail's pace → avec une extrême lenteursnail mail n
to send sth by snail mail → envoyer qch par la poste

snail

nSchnecke f; edible snailWeinbergschnecke f; at a snail’s paceim Schneckentempo

snail

[sneɪl] nchiocciola
at a snail's pace → a passo di lumaca

snail

(sneil) noun
a kind of soft-bodied small crawling animal with a coiled shell. Snails leave a silvery trail as they move along.
at a snail's pace
very slowly. The old man walked along at a snail's pace.

snail

حَلَزُون hlemýžď snegl Schnecke σαλιγκάρι caracol kuorellinen etana escargot puž lumaca カタツムリ 달팽이 slak snegle ślimak caracol улитка snigel หอยทาก salyangoz con ốc sên 蜗牛

snail

n caracol m
References in classic literature ?
The Hurons are boasters," said Uncas, scornfully; "their 'totem' is a moose, and they run like snails.
Hereupon, the offended fowl stalked away on his long stilts, and utterly withdrew his notice from Phoebe and the rest of human nature, until she made her peace with an offering of spice-cake, which, next to snails, was the delicacy most in favor with his aristocratic taste.
Snails clung to the sides of the tank; tadpoles and tiny fish swam swiftly in the green water, slippery efts and slimy frogs twined their noiseless way in and out of the weedy rock-work; and on top of the pyramid there sat solitary, cold as the stone, brown as the stone, motionless as the stone, a little bright-eyed toad.
Nor was that all, for crawling together on flat tables of rock or letting themselves drop into the sea with loud reports I beheld huge slimy monsters--soft snails, as it were, of incredible bigness--two or three score of them together, making the rocks to echo with their barkings.
They observed by my teeth, which they viewed with great exactness, that I was a carnivorous animal; yet most quadrupeds being an overmatch for me, and field mice, with some others, too nimble, they could not imagine how I should be able to support myself, unless I fed upon snails and other insects, which they offered, by many learned arguments, to evince that I could not possibly do.
Like snails, we were fixed to our shells, and I declare it is easy to lead a snail's life.
I tried to think of some good reason why "big things" should hunt foxes, and he should not hunt snails, but none came into my head: so I said at last, "Well, I suppose one's as good as the other.
She went stealthily as a cat through this profusion of growth, gathering cuckoo-spittle on her skirts, cracking snails that were underfoot, staining her hands with thistle-milk and slug-slime, and rubbing off upon her naked arms sticky blights which, though snow-white on the apple-tree trunks, made madder stains on her skin; thus she drew quite near to Clare, still unobserved of him.
Like snails we wound our silent and careful way among the huge, recumbent forms.
And then, in proportion as he plunged deeper into the street, cripples in bowls, blind men and lame men, swarmed about him, and men with one arm, and with one eye, and the leprous with their sores, some emerging from little streets adjacent, some from the air-holes of cellars, howling, bellowing, yelping, all limping and halting, all flinging themselves towards the light, and humped up in the mire, like snails after a shower.
So who may say that it is nice to eat snails and frogs' legs and oysters, but disgusting to feed upon grubs and beetles, or that a raw oyster, hoof, horns, and tail, is less revolting than the sweet, clean meat of a fresh-killed buck?
Incontinently his little white apron would be caught up over his head like a naughty boy's garments, and his feeble little cane would be seen to wrestle and struggle unavailingly in his hand, and his legs would undergo tremendous agitation, and Toby himself all aslant, and facing now in this direction, now in that, would be so banged and buffeted, and to touzled, and worried, and hustled, and lifted off his feet, as to render it a state of things but one degree removed from a positive miracle, that he wasn't carried up bodily into the air as a colony of frogs or snails or other very portable creatures sometimes are, and rained down again, to the great astonishment of the natives, on some strange corner of the world where ticket- porters are unknown.