snakebite

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snake·bite

 (snāk′bīt′)
n.
1. The bite of a snake.
2. Poisoning resulting from the bite of a venomous snake.

snakebite

(ˈsneɪkˌbaɪt)
n
1. (Pathology) a bite inflicted by a snake, esp a venomous one
2. (Brewing) a drink of cider and lager

snake•bite

(ˈsneɪkˌbaɪt)

n.
1. the bite of a snake, esp. of one that is venomous.
2. the resulting painful, toxic condition.
[1830–40]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.snakebite - a bite inflicted by a (venomous) snake
bite - a wound resulting from biting by an animal or a person
Translations
kígyóharapáskígyómarás

snakebite

[ˈsneɪkbaɪt] Nmordedura f de serpiente, picadura f de serpiente

snakebite

snake bite [ˈsneɪkbaɪt] nmorsure f de serpentsnake charmer ncharmeur/euse m/f de serpentsnakes and ladders n sorte de jeu de l'oie

snakebite

[ˈsneɪkˌbaɪt] nmorso di serpente
References in periodicals archive ?
Blood safety and laboratory technology: the clinical management of snake bites in the South East Asian Region: annex 3--antivenoms for treating bites by South East Asian snakes--(listed by country of manufacture).
To reduce this number the specific and affordable antivenom must be available in hospitals, along with physicians properly trained in management of snake bites.
Trevor, of Uckfield, East Sussex, said: "Luckily a specialist in A&E had dealt with snake bites before.
About 50% of Tiger snake bites result in significant envenoming and prior to antivenom therapy there was a mortality of 45% (1).
5 million snake bites may occur annually, scientists have estimated.
Clinical profile of snake bites at SRTR Medical College Hospital, Ambajogai (Maharastra).
In a 1998 study, 54% of calls to Australian Poisons Information Centres reported envenoming cases were due to spider bites, 40% calls reported insect stings and 3% calls reported snake bites (4).
Key Words: coral snake, snake bites, Micrurus tener, Micrurus fulvius tenere, Texas, venom
and snake bites are surely among the least of them" is a great error.
VENOM experts at the Liverpool school of tropical medicine have found a new way to make antidotes to deadly snake bites.
If a venomous snake bites someone, he or she must seek immediate medical attention at a local emergency room.
As the snake bites down on the blob, movements travel through the gel.