Socrates


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Related to Socrates: Socratic method, Plato

Soc·ra·tes

 (sŏk′rə-tēz′) 470?-399 bc.
Greek philosopher whose indefatigable search for ethical knowledge challenged conventional mores and led to his trial and execution on charges of impiety and corrupting the youth. Although Socrates wrote nothing, his method of question and answer is captured in the dialogues of Plato, his greatest pupil.

Socrates

(ˈsɒkrəˌtiːz)
n
(Biography) ?470–399 bc, Athenian philosopher, whose beliefs are known only through the writings of his pupils Plato and Xenophon. He taught that virtue was based on knowledge, which was attained by a dialectical process that took into account many aspects of a stated hypothesis. He was indicted for impiety and corruption of youth (399) and was condemned to death. He refused to flee and died by drinking hemlock

Soc•ra•tes

(ˈsɒk rəˌtiz)

n.
469?–399 B.C., Athenian philosopher.
So•crat•ic (səˈkræt ɪk) adj., n.
So•crat′i•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Socrates - ancient Athenian philosopherSocrates - ancient Athenian philosopher; teacher of Plato and Xenophon (470-399 BC)
Translations
Сократ
Sòcrates
Sókratés
Sokrates
Sokrates
Sokrates
סוקראטס
Socrates
Sokrates
Sokrates
Sócrates
Sokrates
Sokrat
Сократ
Sokrates
Sokrates

Socrates

[ˈsɒkrətiːz] NSócrates

Socrates

nSokrates m

Socrates

[ˈsɒkrəˌtiːz] nSocrate m
References in classic literature ?
Socrates replies that he does not as yet know what virtue is, and has never known anyone who did.
Meno confesses his inability, and after a process of interrogation, in which Socrates explains to him the nature of a 'simile in multis,' Socrates himself defines figure as 'the accompaniment of colour.
The principal characters in the Republic are Cephalus, Polemarchus, Thrasymachus, Socrates, Glaucon, and Adeimantus.
He is eager that Socrates should come to visit him, fond of the poetry of the last generation, happy in the consciousness of a well-spent life, glad at having escaped from the tyranny of youthful lusts.
It certainly agrees in tone and character with the description of Xenophon, who says in the Memorabilia that Socrates might have been acquitted 'if in any moderate degree he would have conciliated the favour of the dicasts;' and who informs us in another passage, on the testimony of Hermogenes, the friend of Socrates, that he had no wish to live; and that the divine sign refused to allow him to prepare a defence, and also that Socrates himself declared this to be unnecessary, on the ground that all his life long he had been preparing against that hour.
The Apology of Plato is not the report of what Socrates said, but an elaborate composition, quite as much so in fact as one of the Dialogues.
The Crito seems intended to exhibit the character of Socrates in one light only, not as the philosopher, fulfilling a divine mission and trusting in the will of heaven, but simply as the good citizen, who having been unjustly condemned is willing to give up his life in obedience to the laws of the state.
The days of Socrates are drawing to a close; the fatal ship has been seen off Sunium, as he is informed by his aged friend and contemporary Crito, who visits him before the dawn has broken; he himself has been warned in a dream that on the third day he must depart.
For if Socrates exists, one will be true and the other false, but if he does not exist, both will be false; for neither 'Socrates is ill' nor 'Socrates is well' is true, if Socrates does not exist at all.
Socrates-Plato" might be used to mean "Socrates precedes Plato"; "PlaSocrates-to" might be used to mean "Plato was born before Socrates and died after him"; and so on.
though this is what Socrates regards as a proof that a city is entirely one), for the word All is used in two senses; if it means each individual, what Socrates proposes will nearly take place; for each person will say, this is his own son, and his own wife, and his own property, and of everything else that may happen to belong to him, that it is his own.
The antient philosophers, such as Socrates, Alcibiades, and others, did not use to argue with their scholars.