Socratic method


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Socratic method

n.
A pedagogical technique in which a teacher does not give information directly but instead asks a series of questions, with the result that the student comes either to the desired knowledge by answering the questions or to a deeper awareness of the limits of knowledge.

Socratic method

n
(Philosophy) philosophy the method of instruction by question and answer used by Socrates in order to elicit from his pupils truths he considered to be implicitly known by all rational beings. Compare maieutic

Socrat′ic meth′od


n.
the use of questions, as employed by Socrates, to develop a latent idea in the mind of a student or elicit an admission from an opponent.
[1735–45]

Socratic method

- A teaching technique in which a teacher does not give information directly but instead asks a series of questions, with the result that the student comes either to the desired knowledge by answering the questions or to a deeper awareness of the limits of knowledge.
See also related terms for teacher.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Socratic method - a method of teaching by question and answerSocratic method - a method of teaching by question and answer; used by Socrates to elicit truths from his students
pedagogics, pedagogy, teaching method - the principles and methods of instruction
References in classic literature ?
It is Adeimantus again who volunteers the criticism of common sense on the Socratic method of argument, and who refuses to let Socrates pass lightly over the question of women and children.
The Socratic method is nominally retained; and every inference is either put into the mouth of the respondent or represented as the common discovery of him and Socrates.
With a focus on marine environments, the organization's Shipboard STEM Education program combines the Socratic Method with fun and educational activities designed to help students be successful in the classroom and beyond.
It's called There Is NO F*ing Secret: Letters From a Badass Bitch, and serves as a sort of epistolary memoir, in which Osbourne writes to many of the most important people in her life and what she's learned from them, which in turn is meant to be passed on to her readership in a kind of oppositional Socratic method in which answers receive more answers.
Using the Socratic Method of teaching (asking questions to stimulate critical thinking), I was able to fully explore the underlying beliefs that shaped the students' views and opinions, which greatly facilitated my professional development.
But one defender of the Socratic method maintains that to prepare students for the rigors of having their work challenged by supervising lawyers, courts, and opposing counsel, they need to be pre-stressed, like strengthened concrete.
The premise of the Socratic method is to continue questioning, always getting deeper into the thinking.
In all cases, obtaining contrary, independent opinions and using a Socratic Method that relies on deep, probing questions is critical.
But then, as a true teacher utilizing the Socratic method of question and answer, the real lesson is that knowledge is a journey, not a destination, that the journey is often far more engaging and fruitful than the dead end of a final destination.
Scholars of philosophy discuss the Socratic method of philosophical inquiry from the perspectives of philosophical counseling, philosophy for children, philosophical walks, Socratic dialogue methods, Philo cafes, and contemplative philosophical practices.
Now clearly, not every college classroom is a likely space to engage Big Questions, but every discipline has some--they're at the heart of the Socratic method, the oldest tool for teaching critical thinking.
The essay first describes a certain neglected aspect of the Socratic method.