solenoid

(redirected from Solenoids)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
click for a larger image
solenoid

so·le·noid

 (sō′lə-noid′)
n.
1. A current-carrying coil of wire that acts like a magnet when a current passes through it.
2. An assembly used as a switch, consisting of a coil and a metal core free to slide along the coil axis under the influence of the magnetic field.

[French solénoïde, from Greek sōlēnoeidēs, pipe-shaped : sōlēn, pipe + -oeidēs, -oid.]

so′le·noi′dal (-noid′l) adj.
so′le·noi′dal·ly adv.

solenoid

(ˈsəʊlɪˌnɔɪd)
n
1. (Electronics) a coil of wire, usually cylindrical, in which a magnetic field is set up by passing a current through it
2. (Electronics) a coil of wire, partially surrounding an iron core, that is made to move inside the coil by the magnetic field set up by a current: used to convert electrical to mechanical energy, as in the operation of a switch
3. (Automotive Engineering) such a device used as a relay, as in a motor vehicle for connecting the battery directly to the starter motor when activated by the ignition switch
[C19: from French solénoïde, from Greek sōlēn a pipe, tube]
ˌsoleˈnoidal adj
ˌsoleˈnoidally adv

so•le•noid

(ˈsoʊ ləˌnɔɪd, ˈsɒl ə-)

n.
a coil of wire that, when carrying current, magnetically attracts a sliding iron core.
[1825–35; < French solénoïde < Greek sōlḗn pipe, channel]
so`le•noi′dal, adj.
click for a larger image
solenoid

so·le·noid

(sō′lə-noid′)
A coil of wire that acts as a magnet when an electric current passes through it.

solenoid

A wire coil partly surrounding an iron core. When current flows through the wire it produces an electromagnetic effect.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.solenoid - a coil of wire around an iron coresolenoid - a coil of wire around an iron core; becomes a magnet when current passes through the coil
coil - reactor consisting of a spiral of insulated wire that introduces inductance into a circuit
magnet - (physics) a device that attracts iron and produces a magnetic field
Translations

solenoid

[ˈsəʊlənɔɪd] Nsolenoide m

solenoid

nMagnetspule f; solenoid switchMagnetschalter m

solenoid

[ˈsəʊlɪˌnɔɪd] n (Phys, Elec) → solenoide m
References in periodicals archive ?
The 70 newly developed items include 34 models of Bosch series starter solenoids (T&X No.
Solenoids, coils of wire used to generate a controlled magnetic field, can be found virtually everywhere parts are in motion, from sorting millions of envelopes daily at the U.
The rotary solenoids are up to 25% more reliable than linear solenoid technologies, and can match the advanced reliability of IRIS shutter technologies.
For stage-2 damping, different types of solenoids were constructed and tested, in order to understand the nature of magnetic field formed inside the solenoid.
It requires an input of 7-12VDC to the VIN pin to operate; this is a separate requirement from the 24VDC that the solenoids need.
Thanks to their extensive safety valve testing capabilities, improved diagnostics data and market-leading pneumatics capacity, all ValvGuard safety solenoids improve plant safety.
With an extensive range of approvals, Pneumatrol solenoids are the standard specification within many world class companies.
Intended for remote or renewable energy applications where rechargeable or standard batteries or capacitors are used, the new Geeplus range of small Push-Pull solenoids is presented as a robust solution for a number of applications requiring a significant holding force using minimal power.
The company formerly known as Westool was established in St Helen Auckland in 1946 and in its heyday it employed over 1,000 people producing solenoids for a variety of industrial applications.
Recovering in intensive care, John struck on the solution of how to power his 'Rim Combi' locking system, which would be the world's only electronic replacement for the traditional 'Yale' type lock cylinder: He said: "While waiting for my operation, despite being severely disabled, I carried on with the designs using traditional solenoids which have been around since the early 1900s, but I couldn't get it to produce the power it needed to work properly.
This article compares the specific characteristics of solenoids and motors, their common properties, and those attributes that make each of these electromechanical devices unique for a specific medical motion application.
Failed solenoids are becoming all too common with the IHMEE's hydraulic system.