sophism

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soph·ism

 (sŏf′ĭz′əm)
n.
1. A plausible but fallacious argument.
2. Deceptive or fallacious argumentation.

[Middle English sophime, sophisme, from Old French sophime, from Latin sophisma, from Greek, from sophizesthai, to be subtle, from sophos, clever, wise.]

sophism

(ˈsɒfɪzəm)
n
(Philosophy) an instance of sophistry. Compare paralogism
[C14: from Latin sophisma, from Greek: ingenious trick, from sophizesthai to use clever deceit, from sophos wise, clever]

soph•ism

(ˈsɒf ɪz əm)

n.
1. a specious argument for displaying ingenuity in reasoning or for deceiving someone.
2. any false argument; fallacy.
[1300–50]

sophism

1. a specious argument for displaying ingenuity in reasoning or for deceiving someone.
2. any false argument or fallacy. — sophister, n.sophistic, adj.
See also: Argumentation
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sophism - a deliberately invalid argument displaying ingenuity in reasoning in the hope of deceiving someone
fallacy, false belief - a misconception resulting from incorrect reasoning

sophism

noun
Plausible but invalid reasoning:
Translations

sophism

[ˈsɒfɪzəm] Nsofisma m

sophism

nSophismus m
References in classic literature ?
It may be observed that these sophisms all occur in his cross-examination of Meletus, who is easily foiled and mastered in the hands of the great dialectician.
Happily for mankind, stupendous fabrics reared on the basis of liberty, which have flourished for ages, have, in a few glorious instances, refuted their gloomy sophisms.
And then, as I walked fast along the road, there rose upon me a strange, inly-felt idea of some Great Being, unseen, but all present, who in His beneficence desired only my welfare, and now watched the struggle of good sad evil in my heart, and waited to see whether I should obey His voice, heard in the whispers of my conscience, or lend an ear to the sophisms by which His enemy and mine--the Spirit of Evil --sought to lead me astray.
Labor and Clergy, Nobility and Merchandise, had come to rest upon the marble table of the Palais de Justice, and to utter, in the presence of the honest audience, as many sentences and maxims as could then be dispensed at the Faculty of Arts, at examinations, sophisms, determinances, figures, and acts, where the masters took their degrees.
Will they not be sophisms captivating to the ear, having nothing in them genuine, or worthy of or akin to true wisdom?
I had before been moved by the sophisms of the being I had created; I had been struck senseless by his fiendish threats; but now, for the first time, the wickedness of my promise burst upon me; I shuddered to think that future ages might curse me as their pest, whose selfishness had not hesitated to buy its own peace at the price, perhaps, of the existence of the whole human race.
Distinction of sides is intended by Nature to imply distinction of colours" -- such was the sophism which in those days flew from mouth to mouth, converting whole towns at a time to the new culture.
but what you say looks very much like a sophism, my dear philosophic friend.
There is a well known, so-called sophism of the ancients consisting in this, that Achilles could never catch up with a tortoise he was following, in spite of the fact that he traveled ten times as fast as the tortoise.
He can only produce out of their armoury the sophism, 'that you can neither enquire into what you know nor into what you do not know;' to which Socrates replies by his theory of reminiscence.
Centinel," the most prolific of the anti-Federalists, fueled those fears with a reminder of the conflict just overcome and the threat that it might return: "Every person acquainted with the history of the courts in England, knows by what ingenious sophisms they have .
In the work of popularization for which he was best known in his lifetime, the Economic Sophisms, Bastiat used a variety of formats, including essays written in informal or more conversational prose, essays written in dialog or constructed in conversational form, stand-alone economic tales or fables, fictional letters or petitions to government officials and other documents, essays written in more formal or academic prose, and direct appeals to the workers and citizens of France.