Sophocles

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Soph·o·cles

 (sŏf′ə-klēz′) 496?-406 bc.
Greek dramatist whose Oedipus Rex was described by Aristotle as the perfect tragedy. Among his other surviving plays are Ajax and Antigone.

Soph′o·cle′an adj.

Sophocles

(ˈsɒfəˌkliːz)
n
(Biography) ?496–406 bc, Greek dramatist; author of seven extant tragedies: Ajax, Antigone, Oedipus Rex, Trachiniae, Electra, Philoctetes, and Oedipus at Colonus
Sophoclean adj

Soph•o•cles

(ˈsɒf əˌkliz)

n.
495?–406? B.C., Greek playwright.
Soph`o•cle′an, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Sophocles - one of the great tragedians of ancient Greece (496-406 BC)Sophocles - one of the great tragedians of ancient Greece (496-406 BC)
Translations

Sophocles

[ˈsɒfəkliːz] NSófocles

Sophocles

nSophokles m

Sophocles

[ˈsɒfəˌkliːz] nSofocle m
References in periodicals archive ?
The story is Sophoclean in its clarity and perfect for the kind of historical fiction that dominates the literary marketplace: clean lines, strong characters and a colorful time and place to animate the drama.
10) Ormand (1999,1-34) traces female subjectivities in the context of Sophoclean representations of marriage, and draws attention to the way in which Athenian law viewed the boundary between married and not married as "dependent specifically on the couple behaving in an appropriate manner in a variety of social contexts" (2).
448) Sophoclean tragedy in particular highlights that social values remain fundamentally incommensurable--and that any attempt to tame this incommensurability through political power ends in failure and tragic loss.
Bergman's script does not say whether the Electra during which Elisabet has gone mute is the Sophoclean tragedy or the more comical, parodic version by Euripides.
Tonight (Thursday) he makes his first appearance of the season, conducting his BBC Symphony Orchestra in a programme beginning with Beethoven's Egmont Overture, continuing with the UK premiere of the BBC co-commissioned Duende - the Dark Notes by Luca Francesconi, Leila Josefowicz the violin soloist, and ending with Stravinsky's stark opera-oratorio Oedipus Rex, its Sophoclean text reworked by the great French poet Jean Cocteau.
To what degree can the aesthetic, social, and religious dimensions of Sophoclean tragedy be replicated in the context of sixteenth-century Italy while honoring its integrity and identity as a work of art?
This essay (the one I wish I'd written) gives a particularly strong reading of these narrating voices as 'exceeding' the Sophoclean polarities represented by Antigone and her sister Ismene.
In what could sometimes pass for a Sophoclean tragedy, if not for the very real consequences, these two opposing nations cannot seem to get in step long enough to find ways to resolve their standing grievances.
With Sophoclean stagecraft Pilate presents Jesus whipped, beaten, crowned in thorns, mocked in purple: "Behold the man
This duality in the play, epitomized by the "[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]" ("double melody") of Heracles's drunken singing and the servants' lament, is typical of Euripides' irony and uncertainty of tone, described by Ann Michelini: "Because Euripidean irony opposes itself directly to Sophoclean high mimetic, it continually brings tragedy to the brink of its antithesis, its very annihilation.
Because Oedipus is the most readily familiar Greek tragedy and because we have become, since the nineteenth century, accustomed to referring to Sophoclean irony, I will tend to invoke it as my exemplum, all the while aware that, as Sedgewick chided, '"Sophoclean irony' is a term that had to wait for the nineteenth century to coin; and it is mere luck that the epithet was not 'Aeschylean' or 'Euripidean'" (p.
A certain Apollodorus describes a pivotal encounter between Oedipus and the Sphinx at the Greek city of Thebes, a scene that sets the stage for the events of the Sophoclean tragedy Oedipus Rex.