Sorbian


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Related to Sorbian: Upper Sorbian

Sor·bi·an

 (sôr′bē-ən)
n.
1. A Sorb.
2. Either of the two West Slavic languages, Lower Sorbian and Upper Sorbian, spoken by the Sorbs. Also called Wendish.

Sor′bi·an adj.

Sorbian

(ˈsɔːbɪən)
n
(Languages) a West Slavonic language spoken in the rural areas of E Germany between the upper reaches of the Oder and Elbe rivers; modern Wendish
adj
1. (Peoples) of or relating to the Sorbs or their language
2. (Languages) of or relating to the Sorbs or their language

Sorb•i•an

(ˈsɔr bi ən)

n.
1. the West Slavic language of the Sorbs, having distinct northern and southern literary forms.
adj.
2. of or pertaining to the Sorbs or their language.
[1830–40]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Sorbian - a speaker of Sorbian
Deutschland, FRG, Germany, Federal Republic of Germany - a republic in central Europe; split into East Germany and West Germany after World War II and reunited in 1990
Slav - any member of the people of eastern Europe or Asian Russia who speak a Slavonic language
2.Sorbian - a Slavonic language spoken in rural area of southeastern Germany
Slavic, Slavic language, Slavonic, Slavonic language - a branch of the Indo-European family of languages
References in periodicals archive ?
1936) is one of the premier Sorbian writers of our day.
Groups of "potential minority status" (by linguistic or religious characteristics) have, as a rule either been assimilated into the majority population (as the case of Low German and Low Sorbian speakers) or chosen exodus (the Protestant Polish-speaking Masurians).
She examines the political context of ethnocultural minorities in Europe, theories on language and culture, and the conditions of Gaelic and Sorbian speakers.
We follow the explanation presented in Carlton (1990:114), namely *t and *d before *j surfaced as affricates in West Slavic and the change from voiced affricate to [z] in Czech and Sorbian was a later development.
These languages include: Asturian Faroese Papago Shona Aymara Frisian Provencal Sorbian Bemba Inuktitut Romany Swazi Blackfoot Kongo Romansch Tongan Cebuano Maori Ruanda Chamorro Maya Samoan Cornish Nahuatl Sepedi
Contract notice: Maintenance, basic and glass cleaning at the school site sorbian school and community center bautzen.
6 million citizens and residents of Turkish descent; Danish minority in the north, Sorbian (Slavic) minority in the east; 7.
TALENTS: Anthony Zammit loves both his roles; Pictures by IAN COOPER; COLOURFUL: Sorbian folk dance group Schmerlitz above and right, and, Romanian dancers Doina Timisului, above right
IN HIS RECENT NOVELLA DIE EINLADUNG, the Sorbian writer Jurij Brezan revives the figures from and reconnects to his critically acclaimed Hanusch trilogy (Der Gymnasiast, 1958; Das Semester der verlorenen Zeit, 1960; and Mannesjahre, 1964) to thematize and problematize East and West German history, the role of memory, and the German notion of Heimat.
That, in fact, is the way it seemed to be for Lutheran immigrant Mato Kosyk (1853-1940) until it was discovered just recently that the folks back home in Europe--those who bade him farewell in 1883 either with great hopes and dreams or with a reprimand for having abandoned the Sorbian cause--are now regarding him as their greatest poet and as one of the three greatest Sorbian writers who ever lived
The production, called Salted, is a project involving eight theatre companies from European minority language communities like the Basque Country, Occitania, Ireland and Sorbian in Germany.
Slavonic is typically divided into three main branches: East Slavonic, which includes modern-day Russian, Ukrainian, and Belarusian, West Slavonic (Czech, Slovak, Polish, Cassubian, Lower Sorbian, and Upper Sorbian), and South Slavonic (Slovene, Serbo-Croat, Bulgarian, and Macedonian).