Soufrière Hills

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Soufrière Hills

A volcano, 915 m (3,002 ft) high, on southern Montserrat in the Leeward Islands of the West Indies. It began erupting in 1995 for the first time in recorded history, causing the evacuation of thousands of residents.
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Look closer and you can still see, here and there, the possessions of families who ed as the ash cloud billowed from the previously dormant Soufriere Hills volcano on July 18, 1995.
Look closer and you can still see, here and there, the possessions of families who fled as the ash cloud billowed from the previously dormant Soufriere Hills volcano on July 18, 1995.
Ninety percent of its buildings were damaged, and the task of rebuilding had hardly been completed when the island suffered an eruption of the previously dormant, Soufriere Hills Volcano, on July 18, 1995.
Owner Nigel Osborne said three companies are utilizing the government's invitation to ship sand via the pier, out of use since the Soufriere Hills volcano began erupting more than 15 years ago.
Some of those particles come from volcanic eruptions, such as the Soufriere Hills volcano in Montserrat that has been puttering along since 1995.
Soufriere Hills volcano is an active volcano that lies in the south-central part of the volcanic island, Montserrat West Indies.
The explosion of the Soufriere Hills volcano, on the island of Montserrat, sent ash bellowing up to 40,000ft into the sky.
Their Boeing 737 was flying from Toronto, Canada, to St Lucia when the Soufriere Hills volcano erupted as they flew over the island of Montserrat.
The Soufriere Hills volcano became active in 1995 and killed 19 people when it erupted two years later, burying much of the British territory and prompting half its 12,000 inhabitants to leave.
For the past 10 years or so, the Caribbean island of Montserrat, 50 miles or so from Martinique, has been plagued by eruptions from its Soufriere Hills volcano.
Jonathan Stone, who studied at Merchant Taylors' Boys School, has jetted out to the idyllic Caribbean island to study the once dormant Soufriere Hills volcano which devastated the island during an eruption in 1997.
The researchers used data from eruptions of a variety of volcanoes including the Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat; Mount Merapi, Indonesia; Mount Unzen, Japan, and Colima, Mexico to develop a predictive equation for mapping the hazard.