international law

(redirected from Sources of international law)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

international law

n.
The set of laws that govern relations between countries, as established by custom and agreement. Also called law of nations.

international law

n
(Law) the body of rules generally recognized by civilized nations as governing their conduct towards each other and towards each other's subjects

in′terna′tional law′


n.
the body of rules that nations generally recognize as binding in their conduct toward one another.
[1830–40]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.international law - the body of laws governing relations between nations
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
admiralty law, marine law, maritime law - the branch of international law that deals with territorial and international waters or with shipping or with ocean fishery etc.
civil law - the body of laws established by a state or nation for its own regulation
Translations

international law

nVölkerrecht nt, → internationales Recht
References in periodicals archive ?
2) Particularly relevant to my subject today, Charney had a special interest in the sources of international law, including customary international law and the role of international organizations.
peremptory norms in the positive sources of international law.
Moreover, the book provides an international law chronology and a guide to electronic sources of international law, organized as a law library, in order to help scholars to find useful materials accessible on the internet in particular topics of their researches: international conventions, international custom, general principles of law, judicial decisions and teachings of publicists, guides, encyclopedias and digests.
Adopting a classical legal methodology, she pursues the answer by examining three issues: the conventional meaning of the right to self-determination of peoples, the extent to which a legal entitlement to remedial secession has emerged under sources of international law other than custom, and the extent to which an entitlement to remedial secession has emerged under customary international law.
As a member of the UN, the Republic of South Sudan has reaffirmed its faith in fundamental human rights and has committed itself to the pursuit of justice and respect for obligations arising from treaties and other sources of international law.
The United Nations Charter determines to "reaffirm faith in fundamental human rights, in the dignity and worth of the human person, in the equal rights of men and women and of nations large and small, and to establish conditions under which justice and respect for the obligations arising from treaties and other sources of international law can be maintained".
The Statute of the International Court of Justice, for example, outlines the three primary sources of international law (treaties, custom, and "general principles of law recognized by civilized nations"), (65) and provides that the writings of jurists and scholars may be of service as a subsidiary source.