Soviet Central Asia


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Soviet Central Asia

n
(Placename) the region of the former Soviet Union now occupied by Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan. Also called: Russian Turkestan or West Turkestan
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References in periodicals archive ?
It also includes previous Soviet Central Asia, Caspian Sea, parts of inner China, Xinjiang province of China, Inner Mongolia as well as parts of Tibet.
True tales by one of Scotland's greatest adventurers, transporting readers from Soviet Central Asia to Yugoslavia during World War II.
The significance of the study of Soviet Central Asia does not lie in assigning labels such as "empire" or "colonialism," but instead in adding a new perspective to debates on continuity and change in Soviet history, as well as on the disrupting effects of Bolshevik and Jadidist attempts to transform, "modernize," and "civilize" supposedly backward regions and peoples.
Babak Rezvani analyzes a dataset of ethno-territorial encounters in the former Soviet Central Asia, the Caucasus and the region of Fereydan in central Iran during the period of perestroika and glasnost (p.
Slightly larger than California, Turkmenistan is almost equidistant from the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans and occupies the south-western corner of what was formerly Soviet Central Asia.
Botakoz Kassymbekoya, in his essay, "Hapless Imperialists: European Developers in Soviet Central Asia in the 1920s and 1930s," traces Tajik statehood to the Soviet imperialism in the early twentieth century, when Tajikistan was forcibly incorporated into the Soviet state.
Jinnah, the author explains, read Muslim nationalism in world-historical terms alone, as a product of world wars and the failure of multinational states, as a vehicle for the liberation of Muslims oppressed in places like China and Soviet Central Asia, and as an "unfortunate necessity" (38, 39).
Putin and Xi also talked about the Silk Road Economic Belt, an ambitious Beijing project intended to encourage the infrastructure development in formerly Soviet Central Asia.
The Third World Peoples of Soviet Central Asia, Disponivel em: <http://www.
The restless valley in the title refers to the Fergana Valley, the most fertile region of the former Soviet Central Asia, divided by Stalin between the Uzbek, Tajik and Kyrgyz SSRs.
It is at the center of what was once Soviet Central Asia, with the largest population (about 30 million, almost as much as the other four "stans" combined) and the greatest concentration of industry and transportation links.
In the 1980s and into the 1990s, there was a dominant western perception that the indigenous people in Soviet Central Asia had failed to integrate into Soviet society and that there was large-scale resistance to political socialisation (Sovietisation) and European-Russian acculturation (Russification).